transposon

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Related to Retrotransposition: Transposons, long interspersed elements

transposon

 [tranz-po´zon]
a discrete DNA sequence that transposes blocks of genetic material back and forth within a bacterial cell from the chromosome to plasmids or bacteriophage particles, by which the material may be transferred to another cell. Transposons frequently carry genes for resistance to antibiotics.

trans·po·son

(tranz-pō'son),
A segment of DNA (for example, an R-factor gene) that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage; the mechanism of transposition seems to be independent of the host's usual recombination mechanism. See: jumping gene, transposable element.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

/trans·po·son/ (trans-po´zon) a small mobile genetic (DNA) element that moves around the genome or to other genomes within the same cell, usually by copying itself to a second site but sometimes by splicing itself out of its original site and inserting in a new location. Eukaryotic transposons are sometimes called transposable elements.

transposon

(trăns-pō′zŏn)
n.
A segment of DNA that is capable of moving into a new position within the same or another chromosome or plasmid. Also called jumping gene.

transposon

[transpō′sən]
Etymology: L, transponere + on
a segment of DNA that can move from one place to another in a cell's genome or between a bacterial cell and a plasmid or virus. Viruses may even carry a transposon from one bacterium to another. Also called jumping gene, transposable element.

trans·po·son

(trans-pō'zon)
A segment of DNA that has a repeat of an insertion sequence element at each end that can migrate from one plasmid to another within the same bacterium, to a bacterial chromosome, or to a bacteriophage.
[L. transpono, pp. transpositum, to transfer, + -on]

transposon

a TRANSPOSABLE GENETIC ELEMENT that often contains genes in addition to those required for transposition, such as antibiotic-resistance genes. There are two main classes in prokaryotes: compound or composite, having copies of an INSERTION SEQUENCE at each end; and complex, having terminal INVERTED REPEAT sequences (generally about 30bp) but no known insertion sequences.

transposon

see transposable genetic elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is, therefore, imperative to understand the mechanisms whereby cancer-related and/or drug-induced hypomethylation may initiate retrotransposition and shorten TL leading to subsequent genomic alterations.
Genomic deletions created upon LINE-1 retrotransposition.
Luning Prak, "DNA Damage and L1 Retrotransposition," Journal of Biomedicine and Biotechnology 2006, no.
20) Zhang and Saier, "Transposon-Mediated Adaptive and Directed Mutations and Their Potential Evolutionary Benefits"; Cordaux and Batzer, "The Impact of Retrotransposons on Human Genome Evolution"; Farkash and Luning Prak, "DNA Damage and L1 Retrotransposition.
Retrotransposition of the Hamster B2 Short Interspersed DNA Element.
We have determined that the mouse B2 element appears to undergo retrotransposition equally well when it utilizes either a human LINE or a mouse LINE.
Further, somatic LINE-1 retrotransposition also occurs in transgenic mouse models (Babushok et al.
Recent work shows that LINE-1 retrotransposition can occur in a tissue-specific fashion (Muotri et al.
LINE-mediated retrotransposition of marked Alu sequences.
LI retrotransposition occurs mainly in embryo-genesis and creates somatic mosaicism.
Nickel stimulates L1 retrotransposition by a post-transcriptional mechanism.
Activation of human long interspersed nuclear element 1 retrotransposition by benzo(a)pyrene, a ubiquitous environmental carcinogen.