restraint

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restraint

 [re-strānt´]
the forcible confinement or control of a subject, as of a confused, disoriented, psychotic, or irrational person; it may be either physical or chemical. Restraint of any kind is used only when the patient's behavior presents a danger to himself or herself or another person. It is never used for the convenience of staff or as a substitute for conscientious nursing care.



Chemical restraint refers to the quieting of a violently psychotic or irrational person by means of medication. Physical restraints include restraining mitts to prevent removal of drainage tubes, restraints of upper and lower limbs to limit mobility and prevent the patient from climbing out of bed or physically harming someone at the bedside, and waist and body restraints such as a camisole (straitjacket). Even though the patient might not fully understand the need for restraint, a brief explanation of why it is being done should be given.

Assessment of the need for physical restraint includes a systematic determination of the level of confusion or disorientation exhibited by the patient and objective observations of his behavior. If possible, the cause of the patient's behavior should be identified, e.g., trauma, drug or alcohol intoxication, electrolyte imbalance, elevated temperature, pain, fear, or mental exhaustion. Findings of the assessment should be well documented in specific terms for legal reasons as well as to inform other caretakers and provide continuity of care.

Alternatives to physical restraint include reality orientation for disoriented patients (clocks, radio, television, newspapers, and magazines will all aid patients to orient themselves to reality); controlling the environment to minimize confusion and stimulation (restraints can intensify anxiety and confusion); and constant attendance at the bedside.

Since restraint of patients subjects them to the hazards of immobility, it is essential that they be monitored closely, their vital signs checked regularly, and their position changed at least every two hours. The use of restraints is an active area of nursing research. The most appropriate and least restrictive type of restraint should always be the one chosen.
Types of restraints: A, Chest restraint; B, Hand mitt restraint; C, Belt restraint; D, Mummy restraint. From Lammon et al., 1996.
jacket restraint camisole.
physical restraint
1. see restraint.
2. in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the application, monitoring, and removal of mechanical restraining devices or manual restraints which are used to limit the physical mobility of a patient.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·straint

(rē-strānt'),
In hospital psychiatry, intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from harming himself, herself, or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straitjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

restraint

(rĭ-strānt′)
n.
1. A device or other means of limiting movement, used to prevent the infliction of harm to self or others.
2. The act of restraining.
3. Control or repression of feelings; constraint.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

restraint

A term for mild bondage used in sexual fantasy enactments.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

restraint

Control or prevention of an action Nursing Any device used to restrict the free movement of Pts with behavioral or physical problems, who may cause harm to themselves and others. See Mechanical restraint, Pharmacologic restraint.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

re·straint

(rĕ-strānt')
psychiatry Intervention to prevent an excited or violent patient from doing harm to her- or himself or others; may involve the use of a camisole (straightjacket).
[O. Fr. restrainte]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
"That will bring together the latest thinking on restraint and de-escalation techniques for the NHS and social care workforce."
Practice guidelines are crucial for guidance in controversial topics such as physical restraints. There are no guidelines generated from international platform.
* Ban mechanical restraints, such as putting children in Rifton Chairs, or taping or tying them to chairs or furniture, or locking them into devices.
One of the most useful pieces of data we developed established that on average, our well-trained staff incurred injuries severe enough to require medical treatment in 1 of every 4 instances of applying mechanical restraints. All staff could appreciate that as restraint usage was reduced, the number of associated staff injuries also would fall.
She said she has no knowledge of the district ever using mechanical, chemical or prone restraints.
'Child Restraint System' refers to a devise capable of accommodating a child occupant in a sitting or supine position (Section 3).
93 of 1996,[3] which mandates child restraints to be used for children less than 3 years of age travelling in a motor vehicle (this came into force in April 2015).
Only nonviolent restraint situations were used for this project due to different criteria for initiation of behavioral restraints.
Data were collected through self administered questionnaire which comprised of 4 parts: 1--Socio demographic profile: included background information of the participants such as age, gender, experience and education; 2--Knowledge questionnaire about the use of physical restraints: used to assess nurses knowledge, towards using the Physical Restraints in psychiatric patients (17) and consisted of 11 items with closed ended responses such as 'true' or false.
A bill requiring child restraint devices in all motor vehicles hurdled the transportation committee in the House of Representatives.
Despite uncertainty over the ability of physical restraints to maintain patient safety, as well as the potential for undesirable psychological patient outcomes and ethical concerns, physical restraint use is common in ICUs of many countries with prevalence ranging from 0% to 100% (Benbenbishty, Adam, & Endacott, 2010).