Apgar score

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Related to Respiratory effort: Apgar Score System

Apgar score

 [ap´gahr]
a method for determining an infant's condition at birth by scoring the heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color. The infant is rated from 0 to 2 on each of the five items, the highest possible score being 10. (See table.) Each of the factors is rated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later. The Apgar score is an objective way of assessing and describing an infant's adaptation to extrauterine life.

Ap·gar score

(ap'gar),
evaluation of a newborn infant's physical status by assigning numerical values (0-2) to each of five criteria: heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, response stimulation, and skin color; a score of 8-10 indicates the best possible condition.

Apgar score

(ăp′gär)
n.
A system of assessing the general physical condition of a newborn infant based on a rating of 0, 1, or 2 for five criteria: heart rate, respiration, muscle tone, skin color, and response to stimuli. The five scores are added together, with a perfect score being 10.

APGAR score

Neonatology, obstetrics A bedside test for evaluating a neonate's post-partum status and potential for survival, based on an acronym of Virginia Apgar's name; the higher the score, the better the infant will fare during the neonatal period
Apgar score
Appearance
Color–0 for blue, 2 for pink
Pulse
Heart rate–0 for none, 1 for <100/min, 2 for > 100/min
Grimace
Reflex–0 for none, 1 for grimace, 2 for cough/sneeze
Activity
Muscle tone–0 for limp, 2 for full flexion
Respiratory effort
0 for absent, 2 for strong crying

Ap·gar score

(ap'gahr skōr)
Evaluation of a newborn infant's physical status by assigning numeric values (0-2) to each of 5 criteria: 1) heart rate, 2) respiratory effort, 3) muscle tone, 4) response to stimulation, and 5) skin color; a score of 8-10 indicates the best possible condition.

Apgar score

A numerical index used to assess the state of well-being of a new-born baby. The figures 0, 1 or 2 are assigned to each of five variables - the heart rate, the breathing, the muscle tone, the reflex irritability and the skin colour, and added. A normal baby will score 7 to 10. (Virginia Apgar, American anaesthetist, 1909–74).

Apgar,

Virginia, U.S. anesthesiologist, 1909-1974.
Apgar score - evaluation of a newborn infant's physical status by assigning numerical values to each of 5 criteria.
Apgar timer
References in periodicals archive ?
But capnography has been shown to detect declining respiratory effort or function up to two hours earlier than oxygen saturation monitoring in patients receiving opioids via patient-controlled analgesia (PCA).
Her physical examamination was unremarkable; respiratory effort, mental status, and strength testing were normal.
Expiratory muscle training and sensation of respiratory effort during exercise in normal subjects.
No significant changes in BP, HR, and Sp[O.sub.2] following the EMST trial were observed, which suggested that, although a high expiratory pressure is generated to open the valve within the device, the duration of that pressure generation is relatively short (1.25 s) and does not require a significant physical and respiratory effort even when the respiratory tasks are repeated [30].
John, also of Mauchline, said: "Katie had a slow heart and little or no respiratory effort, such as moving limbs.
The feedback was provided in order to maximize their respiratory effort and ensure that they were at the end of normal expiration and inspiration for MIP and MEP measurements.
He required initial positive pressure ventilation due to bradycardia and poor respiratory effort.
To date, very few studies have shown significant improvements in the perception of respiratory effort during exercise following a period of respiratory muscle training (24).
On examination, doctors found Amy's breathing rate was 20 per minute, half the normal rate, and she was making a "very poor respiratory effort".
Patients must be fully conscious, able to maintain their own airway and displaying adequate respiratory effort and oxygenation, before discharge from the PACU can be considered (AAGBI 2002).
Any pathological or non-pathological condition that can compromise free airflow during respiratory cycle can result in hypoventilation with increased respiratory effort that can lead to physiological burden involving cardiovascular and temperature regulatory system, psychological stresses.4

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