resorption

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resorption

 [re-sorp´shun]
1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone.
Alveolor Resorption of the alveolar bone in periodontitis. From Darby and Walsh, 1995.

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn),
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption

/re·sorp·tion/ (re-sorp´shun)
1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone.

resorption

[risôrp′shən]
Etymology: L, resorbere, to swallow again
1 the loss of substance or bone by physiological or pathological means, such as the reduction of the volume and size of the residual ridge of the mandible or maxillae.
2 the cementoclastic and dentinoclastic action that may occur on a tooth root. Also called external resorption or internal resorption.

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
1. The act of resorbing.
2. A loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption

the taking back into an organism of any structure or secretion produced.

resorption

physiological or pathological loss of substance, e.g. loss of bone density, due to disuse atrophy or osteoporotic bone demineralization

re·sorp·tion

(rē-sōrp'shŭn)
Loss of substance by lysis, or by physiologic or pathologic means.

resorption (rēzôrp´shən),

n 1. loss of substance (bone) by physiologic or pathologic means; the reduction of the volume and size of the residual alveolar portion of the mandible or maxillae.
n 2. the cementoclastic and dentinoclastic action that often takes place on the root of a replanted tooth.
resorption, apical root,
n dissolution of the apex of a tooth, resulting in a shortened, blunted root.
resorption, bone,
n 1. destruction or solution of the elements of bone.
n 2. loss of bone resulting from the activity of multinucleated giant cells, the osteoclasts, which are noted in irregular concavities on the periphery of the bone (Howship's lacunae).
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Apical root resorption.
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Severe bone resorption in the mandible.
resorption, cemental,
n destruction of cementum by cementoclastic action. Noted as the presence of irregular concavities in the cemental surfaces.
resorption, frontal,
n osteoclastic resorption of alveolar bone (lamina dura) by multinucleated cells on the osseous margin adjacent to the periodontal ligament.
resorption, horizontal,
n a pattern of bone resorption in marginal periodontitis in which the marginal crest of the alveolar bone between adjacent teeth remains level; in these instances the bases of the periodontal pockets are supracrestal; a pattern of bone loss in which the crestal margins of the alveolar bone are resorbed. A horizontal pattern, rather than vertical loss along the root, is the typical type of bone loss in periodontitis.
n resorption that is not attributable to any known disease or is without an apparent cause.
resorption, internal,
n (idiopathic internal resorption, pink tooth), a special form of idiopathic root resorption from within the pulp cavity; granulation tissue is present within the tooth, apparently with the resportion of the dentin occurring from the inside outward. The cause is unknown.
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Internal resorption.
resorption, lacunar,
n loss of bone by cellular activity; osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells seen in irregular concavities in the margin of the bone (Howship's lacunae) and currently believed to be directly responsible for the active destruction of bone.
resorption, pressure, of bone,
n osteoclastic destruction of bone resulting from the application of sustained, excessive force. Remodeling of bone may occur to better adapt to these forces, or destruction may continue if the stresses are repeated and excessive.
resorption, rear,
n See resorption, undermining.
resorption, root,
n destruction of the cementum or dentin by cementoclastic or osteoclastic activity.
resorption, surface root,
n localized resorptive areas on the cemental surface of the tooth root.
resorption, undermining,
n indirect, as opposed to frontal, removal of alveolar bone where pressure applied to a tooth has resulted in loss of vitality of localized areas of the periodontal ligament.
resorption, vertical,
n a pattern of bone loss seen in occlusal traumatism, marginal periodontitis, periodontosis, and other conditions; a pattern of bone loss in which the alveolar bone adjacent to a tooth is destroyed without simultaneous crestal loss, so that a vertical rather than a horizontal pattern of loss is observed.

resorption

1. the lysis and assimilation of a substance, as of bone or fetus.
2. reabsorption.

resorption-formation sequence
while bones are being formed for the first time the sequence is formation followed by resorption and modeling; in remodeling of an existing bone resorption occurs first and is then followed by bone formation.
resorption lacuna
concavities in bone created by osteoclasts.
resorption space
a continuous series of resoption lacunae.
References in periodicals archive ?
As observed in the current study, during ovarian development, the nucleus of hepatopancreatic resorptive cells as well as the nucleus and cytoplasm of hepatopancreatic fibrillar cells were stained with strongly positive PR.
PEIR appears to be resorptive in nature yet the stimulus for this resorption is not known.
Those patients who present with the acute septic-like signs are usually in the resorptive phase and a steroid injection, immobilisation in a sling, local heat and NSAIDs will help to settle the pain.
Treatment by trepanation and studies on bone resorptive factors in cyst fluid with a theory of its pathogenesis.
These features were considered to describe an external resorptive process [Blackwood, 1958].
For example, although it has been recognized for decades that Sr plays a role in bone formation and/or resorption, a new drug Sr ranelate has been shown not only to decrease bone resorption but, in contrast to other bone resorptive drugs, also to build up bone mass (Reginster et al.
Antibone resorptive therapy with oral bisphosphonate agents can pose a particular challenge, since these medications require more effort than simply swallowing a pill.
Measuring the decrease in bone tracer content was not a feasible approach because the resorptive process removes mainly older bone, which contains little or no tracer.
Some of these conditions include [greater than or equal to] 2 previous TMJ surgeries; previous TMJ alloplastic implants containing Proplast/Teflon (PT), Silastic, acrylic, or bone cements; inflammatory or resorptive TMJ pathology; connective tissue or autoimmune disease (i.
Accordingly, potential agents targeting osteoclast apoptosis may display favorable effects in combating resorptive bone diseases.
In CCD, formation and erup tion of the primary dentition is generally normal, but multiple supernumerary teeth are common and the permanent dentition typically has severe eruption problems, possibly due to a defect in the abnormal osteoclastic and resorptive process of the alveolar bone.
In the calcific stage, an increasing calcification is observed during the formative phase, followed first by a period of quiescence and then by a resorptive phase.