resonance

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resonance

 [rez´o-nans]
1. the prolongation and intensification of sound produced by transmission of its vibrations to a cavity, especially such a sound elicited by percussion. Decrease of resonance is called dullness; its increase, flatness.
2. a vocal sound heard on auscultation.
amphoric resonance a sound resembling that produced by blowing over the mouth of an empty bottle.
nuclear magnetic resonance see nuclear magnetic resonance.
skodaic resonance increased percussion resonance at the upper part of the chest, with flatness below it; heard over a large pleural effusion or area of consolidation.
tympanic resonance tympanitic resonance (def. 2).
tympanitic resonance
1. the peculiar sound elicited by percussing a tympanitic abdomen.
2. the drumlike reverberation of a cavity full of air; called also tympanic resonance.
vocal resonance (VR) the sound of ordinary speech as heard through the chest wall.

res·o·nance

(rez'ō-nănts),
1. In chemistry, the manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds that are planar and symmetric, particularly those with conjugated (alternating) double bonds; the existence of resonance in the latter case reduces the energy content and increases the stability of compounds; such molecular entities have more than one contriubuting structure, each differing only in the distribution of electrons.
2. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in the cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound; in speech, modification of the quality (for example, harmonics) of a tone by the passage of air through the chambers of the nose, pharynx, and head, without increasing the intensity of the sound.
3. The sound obtained on percussion of a part that can vibrate freely.
4. The intensification and hollow character of the voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
5. The natural or inherent frequency of any oscillating system.
6. Synonym(s): resonant frequency
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

resonance

(rĕz′ə-nəns)
n.
1.
a. Intensification and prolongation of sound, especially of a musical tone, produced by sympathetic vibration.
b. Intensification of vocal tones during articulation, as by the air cavities of the mouth and nasal passages.
c. Medicine The sound produced by diagnostic percussion of the normal chest.
2. Physics The increase in amplitude of oscillation of an electric or mechanical system exposed to a periodic force whose frequency is equal or very close to the natural undamped frequency of the system.

resonance

An MRI term for a large-amplitude vibration in a mechanical or electrical system caused by a relatively small periodic stimulus with a frequency at or close to the system’s natural frequency. Resonance is also defined as the exchange of energy at a particular frequency between two systems.

res·o·nance

(rez'ŏ-năns)
1. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in the cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound; in speech, modification of the quality (e.g., tone) of a sound by the passage of air through the chambers of the nose, pharynx, and head, without increasing the intensity of the sound.
2. The sound obtained on percussion of a part that can vibrate freely.
3. The intensification and hollow character of the voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
4. chemistry The manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds that are planar and symmetric, particularly those with conjugated (alternating) double bonds; the existence of resonance in the latter case reduces the energy content and increases the stability of a compound.
5. The natural or inherent frequency of any oscillating system.
6. Synonym(s): resonant frequency.
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

res·o·nance

(rez'ŏ-năns)
1. In chemistry, the manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds.
2. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound.
3. Sound obtained on percussion of a body part.
4. Intensification and hollow character of voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

Patient discussion about resonance

Q. who much cost the resonance magnetic machine? new or used

A. here is a company that you can even get a MRI scanner in a leasing program:
http://www.nationwideimaging.com/index.php

More discussions about resonance
References in periodicals archive ?
The proposed metamaterial reveals two distinct strong resonances at ~0.515 THz and ~0.74 THz, respectively.
In summary, if the operating point [f.sub.0] is chosen such that it corresponds to [[xi].sub.o2] [much less than] -1 and simultaneously [[xi].sub.o1] [approximately equal to] 1 - 2, differential phase shifts from both resonances [DELTA][[phi].sub.1], [DELTA][[phi].sub.2] would be positive and add up for some range of magnetic field.
Fano resonance attracts interest due to its universality in many physical systems.
We do not intend to analyze harmonic resonance but to discuss the issues related to electric resonance.
Recent studies have sought to create a scale that is reliable and valid to measure brand resonance, which is considered a gap of current knowledge (Raut, 2015).
The overall tone quality percept is then a blend of the spectral tone colors of harmonics being featured by at least these three vocal tract resonances. For most tones, these three contributions can be summarized as:
If a resonance frequency exists in the structure, a highlight will be observed in the waterfall results.
Both structures (DR and GP slot) are coupled and a minor change in either structure parameter also affects the other resonance. However, as a first-order approximation, both structures are treated independently.
Based on the analysis of the mathematical model of resonance mode, the resonance mode is perceived as a product of a second-order differentiation element and an oscillating element.
In this paper, we propose to extract gear fault torsional vibration signature in resonance region.
The proposed antenna covers WLAN band at 5.8 GHz and upper frequency resonance at 7.6 GHz [23].
Kousouris, "Searches for Dijet resonances at Hadron colliders," International Journal of Modern Physics A, vol.