resonance

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resonance

 [rez´o-nans]
1. the prolongation and intensification of sound produced by transmission of its vibrations to a cavity, especially such a sound elicited by percussion. Decrease of resonance is called dullness; its increase, flatness.
2. a vocal sound heard on auscultation.
amphoric resonance a sound resembling that produced by blowing over the mouth of an empty bottle.
nuclear magnetic resonance see nuclear magnetic resonance.
skodaic resonance increased percussion resonance at the upper part of the chest, with flatness below it; heard over a large pleural effusion or area of consolidation.
tympanic resonance tympanitic resonance (def. 2).
tympanitic resonance
1. the peculiar sound elicited by percussing a tympanitic abdomen.
2. the drumlike reverberation of a cavity full of air; called also tympanic resonance.
vocal resonance (VR) the sound of ordinary speech as heard through the chest wall.

res·o·nance

(rez'ō-nănts),
1. In chemistry, the manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds that are planar and symmetric, particularly those with conjugated (alternating) double bonds; the existence of resonance in the latter case reduces the energy content and increases the stability of compounds; such molecular entities have more than one contriubuting structure, each differing only in the distribution of electrons.
2. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in the cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound; in speech, modification of the quality (for example, harmonics) of a tone by the passage of air through the chambers of the nose, pharynx, and head, without increasing the intensity of the sound.
3. The sound obtained on percussion of a part that can vibrate freely.
4. The intensification and hollow character of the voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
5. The natural or inherent frequency of any oscillating system.
6. Synonym(s): resonant frequency
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

resonance

(rĕz′ə-nəns)
n.
1.
a. Intensification and prolongation of sound, especially of a musical tone, produced by sympathetic vibration.
b. Intensification of vocal tones during articulation, as by the air cavities of the mouth and nasal passages.
c. Medicine The sound produced by diagnostic percussion of the normal chest.
2. Physics The increase in amplitude of oscillation of an electric or mechanical system exposed to a periodic force whose frequency is equal or very close to the natural undamped frequency of the system.

resonance

An MRI term for a large-amplitude vibration in a mechanical or electrical system caused by a relatively small periodic stimulus with a frequency at or close to the system’s natural frequency. Resonance is also defined as the exchange of energy at a particular frequency between two systems.

res·o·nance

(rez'ŏ-năns)
1. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in the cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound; in speech, modification of the quality (e.g., tone) of a sound by the passage of air through the chambers of the nose, pharynx, and head, without increasing the intensity of the sound.
2. The sound obtained on percussion of a part that can vibrate freely.
3. The intensification and hollow character of the voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
4. chemistry The manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds that are planar and symmetric, particularly those with conjugated (alternating) double bonds; the existence of resonance in the latter case reduces the energy content and increases the stability of a compound.
5. The natural or inherent frequency of any oscillating system.
6. Synonym(s): resonant frequency.
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

res·o·nance

(rez'ŏ-năns)
1. In chemistry, the manner in which electrons or electric charges are distributed among the atoms in compounds.
2. Sympathetic or forced vibration of air in cavities above, below, in front of, or behind a source of sound.
3. Sound obtained on percussion of a body part.
4. Intensification and hollow character of voice sound obtained on auscultation over a cavity.
[L. resonantia, echo, fr. re-sono, to resound, to echo]

Patient discussion about resonance

Q. who much cost the resonance magnetic machine? new or used

A. here is a company that you can even get a MRI scanner in a leasing program:
http://www.nationwideimaging.com/index.php

More discussions about resonance
References in periodicals archive ?
It should be noted that the frequency [[omega].sub.0] is the parallel resonance frequency of the [DELTA][C.sub.r] and [C.sub.A] and is also antiresonance frequency.
The biosensor presented in Figure 1 provides a response in terms of a change in the resonance frequency. Liquids with different permittivity values are loaded in the microwell, the electric field is perturbed, and the resonance frequency is changed.
At the resonance frequency of 2.3 GHz, the proposed antenna offers dipolar and omnidirectional radiation patterns in xz- and yz-planes, respectively.
The next step is to determine the resonance frequency [F.sub.air] of the circuit at the MT filled with air:
Without loss of generality, we focus on one resonance frequency [f.sub.n] and the fundamental gear fault frequency [f.sub.g] only.
Figure 8 represents the plots corresponding to region (D) including the second resonance frequency. It is shown that the POM curve in Figure 8(a) corresponds to the absolute curve of the second mode shape.
Meredith, "Implant stability measurements using resonance frequency analysis: biological and biomechanical aspects and clinical implications," Periodontology 2000, vol.
In the case of the ammonia clock, the resonance frequency was high (23.8 GHz), but the resonance width, or the range of frequencies over which the oscillator could resonate, represented by the width of the line in the absorption frequency shown in Fig.
When the actuated microcantilever vibrates in a certain frequency, we measured the resonance frequency of the MC vibration before and after gas detection.
In addition to this function, a series of other functions is also realized, such as maintenance of amplitude, searching for resonance frequency, supervision, and control.
where n is the number of modes of the resonance frequency, and [A.sub.i] is the amplitude of the resonance frequency of mode i.
It also presented the graphical method for determining the damping coefficient based on the desired value of the amplitude of the reduced resonance frequency. Moreover, it has proposed the method of searching for the active force that reduces vibration to the desired amplitude value.

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