Rescue Fantasy

The fantasy held by some suicidal individuals that they will be saved from death—at the last moment—by some intervention
References in periodicals archive ?
Dencik's Puss follows in his footsteps, confronting Robin's rescue fantasy with the power of patriarchy, co-opting class struggle to his own privileged ends.
Doezema (2001) is careful although to not posit a crude western versus Third World binary, recognizing that many Third World feminists and NGOs participate in the rescue fantasy as well complicating the narrative.
It also drew on the legacy of liberal feminism by its investment in a rescue fantasy seeking to free women trapped by misogynist cultural traditions into modernity.
In a section entitled "A Psychoanalytic Supplement," Freedman draws on Freud's theory of the rescue fantasy, in which some men wish to rescue a woman from degradation (121), to explain Conrad's difficulties.
In the psychoanalytic supplement that concludes this chapter Freedman brings Freud's rescue fantasy to bear on the novel's central moral crisis.
"Having that whole rescue fantasy being blown to hell was the greatest down," he says.
"Voting for a Hollywood action hero who symbolizes power and strength represents a statewide rescue fantasy," wrote Patrick Goldstein in the Los Angeles Times.
Ashcroft says it is 'absolutely' possible for a father to love his children and still kill them in this circumstance: 'He may have a rescue fantasy or think, 'This is the way I'm going to save them from the hell of being without a father'.'
Instead, we repeatedly have embraced what Shapiro and others call the "rescue fantasy," "saving" children from presumably bad parents simply by removing them--at times, en masse.
Here Barthelme is following and reiterating the original Freudian explication of the rescue fantasy: "All [the sons] instincts, those of tenderness, gratitude, lustfulness, defiance and independence, find satisfaction in the single wish to be his own father" ("Special Type" 173).