repression

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repression

 [re-presh´un]
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.
3. in psychiatry, a defense mechanism by which a person unconsciously banishes unacceptable ideas, feelings or impulses from consciousness. A person using repression to obtain relief from mental conflict is unaware of “forgetting” unpleasant situations as a way of avoiding them. If done to an extreme, repression may lead to increased tension and irresponsible behavior that the person himself cannot understand or explain.
enzyme repression interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn),
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

/re·pres·sion/ (-presh´un)
1. the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2. in psychiatry, an unconscious defense mechanism in which unacceptable ideas, fears, and impulses are thrust out or kept out of consciousness.

enzyme repression  interference, usually by the endproduct of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
gene repression  the inhibition of gene transcription of an operon; in prokaryotes repressor binding to the operon is involved.

repression

(rĭ-prĕsh′ən)
n.
Psychology The unconscious exclusion of painful impulses, desires, or fears from the conscious mind.

re·pres′sion·ist adj.

repression

[ripresh′ən]
Etymology: L, reprimere, to press back
1 the act of restraining, inhibiting, or suppressing.
2 (in psychoanalysis) an unconscious defense mechanism that also underlies all defense mechanisms, whereby unacceptable thoughts, feelings, ideas, impulses, or memories, especially those concerning some traumatic past event, are pushed from the consciousness because of their painful guilt association or disagreeable content and are submerged in the unconscious, where they remain dormant but operant. Such repressed emotional conflicts are the source of anxiety that may lead to any of the anxiety disorders. Compare suppression. repress, v., repressive, adj.

repression

Psychiatry An unconscious defense mechanism, that blocks unacceptable ideas, fantasies, or impulses from consciousness or that keeps unconsciousness what never was conscious. Cf Suppression Psychoanalysis A mental block to acknowledging an uncomfortable memory or feeling.

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. psychotherapy The active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting, banishing from consciousness, ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to it.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. Inhibition of transcription at a particular site on DNA or MESSENGER RNA by the binding of REPRESSOR PROTEIN to the site.
2. The prevention of the synthesis of certain enzymes by bacterial products.

repression

the state in which a gene is prevented from being transcribed, so that no protein is produced. see OPERON MODEL.

Repression

A unconscious psychological mechanism in which painful or unacceptable ideas, memories, or feelings are removed from conscious awareness or recall.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders

re·pres·sion

(rē-presh'ŭn)
1. In psychotherapy, the active process or defense mechanism of keeping out and ejecting and banishing from consciousness those ideas or impulses that are unacceptable to the ego or superego.
2. Decreased expression of some gene product.
[L. re-primo, pp. -pressus, to press back, repress]

repression

1. the act of restraining, inhibiting or suppressing.
2. in molecular genetics, inhibition of gene transcription by a repressor.

enzyme repression
interference, usually by the end product of a pathway, with synthesis of the enzymes of that pathway.
References in periodicals archive ?
The repression of the opposition requires allocation of economic resources in order to pass repressive laws; establish revolutionary courts, which have been in operation for the last twenty six years since the inception of the regime; build more prisons and secret detention centers; employ special police and security forces; and hire vigilante groups and thugs to attack and kill people.
Consequently, we may observe a new wave of repression in the country.
According to the United Nations report of January 2004, "the climate of fear induced by the systematic repression of people expressing critical views against the authorized political and religious doctrine and the functioning of the institutions coupled with the severe and disproportionate sentences imposed, lead to self-censorship on the part of many journalists, intellectuals, politicians, students and the population at large, thus in effect impeding freedom of expression".
The level of political loyalty and repression to the Supreme Leader depends on two other variables.
With this gain, and the now identified opposition, a new wave of repression started.
If the regime were able to achieve this goal, another wave of repression is anticipated for the reestablishment of the autocratic Supreme Leader credential.