lagging strand

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lagging strand

In DNA replication, the single strand forming a duplex in the direction away from the fork in the parental DNA. Replication on the lagging strand is discontinuous and can occur briefly in both directions.

lagging strand

the strand in DNA replication that is synthesized discontinuously, to generate Okazaki fragments (named after R. Okazaki who first detected them). These are later sealed by DNA LIGASE. See DNA, SEMICONSERVATIVE REPLICATION MODEL.
References in periodicals archive ?
"This explains why patients with BRCA mutations can be treated with chemo drugs that induce DNA damage and replication fork arrest."
The FA/BRCA pathway, which is affected in patients with FA, detects ICLs upon replication fork arrest.
Replication then proceeds bidirectionally around the circle until the two oppositely oriented replication forks approach a termination region approximately 180[degrees] away from the initiation site.
Kong, "Mechanism of chromosomal DNA replication initiation and replication fork stabilization in eukaryotes," Science China Life Sciences, vol.
Besides sequence-independent flap endonuclease activity, FEN-1 has other nuclease activities that include 5' exonuclease activity during recombination and gap-dependent endonuclease (GEN) activity to aid replication fork processes [88-91].
strand form, on each tine of the replication fork, a very strong,
DNA strand cleavage is required for replication fork arrest by a frozen topoisomerase-quinolone-DNA ternary complex.
Focusing on specific bacteria, yeast, fruit flies, the African clawed frog, mice, and humans, they explain how all living organisms store their genome as DNA and how they all use the same evolutionary-conserved mechanism to duplicate it, as well as how this replication fork determines where organisms begin duplication, how they produce a complete copy of their genome each time a cell divides, and how they link duplication to cell division.
Third, upon interaction with a firing factor, the mcm ring opens to eject one dna strand, leading to unwinding of the replication fork and duplication by dedicated replicative polymerases.
However, The passage of the replication fork disrupts parental nucleosomes and challenges existing patterns throughout the genome.
Replication fork barriers (RFBs) include proteins bound to DNA, structure forming sequences and DNA/RNA hybrids.