relaxation response


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re·lax·a·tion re·sponse

an integrated hypothalamic reaction in which a human being or animal experiences safety and a sense of nurturing; resulting in decreased sympathetic nervous system activity that, physiologically and psychologically, is almost a mirror image of fight or flight response; it can be self-induced through the use of techniques associated with transcendental meditation, yoga, and biofeedback.
See also: fight or flight response.

relaxation response

A term coined in 1975 by Dr Herbert Benson of Harvard Medical School for the use of “good breathing techniques”, active muscle relaxation and meditation as a means of lowering blood pressure and reducing internal and external stress.
References in periodicals archive ?
But brain scans of the relaxation response group showed greater activity in the parts of the brain devoted to deliberate control and supplementary motor activity.
There was no significant difference between the [E.sub.max] of relaxation response to SNP of aortic rings from the Sham-V, RAC-V, RAC-E5, RAC-E10, RAC-E20, and RAC-E30 groups (figure 1C).
The long and deep exhalations of the second exercise help the body calm down to "rest and digest"--the same Relaxation Response that Dr.
There were no differences in relaxation responses between 3- and 9-week-old rats in the presence or absence of endothelium.
The body's natural relaxation response is a powerful antidote to stress.
Pharmaceutical companies create drugs that produce the relaxation response in the form of anxiolytics, antihypertensives and other medications that work specifically to produce parasympathetic stimulating effects.
What we need to do is to activate a relaxation response after a fight or flight response and lower our stress levels regularly.
M learned to use diaphragm breathing and breathing awareness to facilitate the relaxation response. Her heart rate decreased from the mid to high 90s to the low 80s/high 70s.
Meditation is also called "the relaxation response" as it elicits the opposite bodily reaction from the "fight-or-flight" response.
His studies found out that, in fact, the body's relaxation response can be triggered by a realistic illusion of a natural view.