domestic violence

(redirected from Relationship violence)
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do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dō-mes'tik vī'ō-lens),
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spouse abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest. Various kinds of abuse, such as sexual abuse, also happen outside the family unit. The American Medical Association and similar organizations outside the U.S. have issued advisory notices to physicians on the detection and treatment of domestic violence.

domestic violence

A pattern of sexual, emotional, psychological or financial abuse of a current or former partner, often punctuated by physical assault or credible threats of bodily harm, occurring in the home.
 
Risk factors
Partner abuse of substances and/or alcohol; intermittent employment or unemployment; lower education.

Medspeak-UK
As defined in the UK, any violence between partners in an intimate relationship, wherever and whenever the violence occurs. DV victims suffer on many levels—health, housing, education­—and lack freedom to live meaningful lives without fear.

Domestic violence in the UK, facts of interest
• Accounts for 16% of all violent crime.
• Has more repeat victims than any other crime (on average there are 35 assaults before a victim calls the police).
• Claims the lives of 2 women/week.
• 60% of offenders are unemployed; many have mental health issues; 36% witnessed violence between their own parents; 48% are alcohol dependent.

domestic violence

Battering Public health A pattern of psychological, economic, and sexual coercion of one partner in a relationship by the other, often punctuated by physical assaults, or credible threats of bodily harm; physical abuse by a 'significant other'–boy/girlfriend, lover, spouse at home Risk factors Partner abuse of substances, alcohol; intermittent employment, unemployment; less than high school education; perpetrator: former spouse, ex-boyfriend. See Abusive behavior, Criminal victimization.

do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dŏ-mĕs'tik vī'ŏ-lĕns)
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spouse abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest. Various kinds of abuse (e.g., sexual abuse) also happen outside of the family unit.

do·mes·tic vi·o·lence

(dŏ-mĕs'tik vī'ŏ-lĕns)
Intentionally inflicted injury perpetrated by and on family member(s); varieties include spousal abuse, child abuse, and sexual abuse, including incest.

Patient discussion about domestic violence

Q. What should I do if I think there is a domestic violence in my building? I think there is a case of domestic violence going on in with my neighbors. I have heard a man hitting a woman and a woman screaming, things being thrown, etc. This type of event will happen several times a week, lasting all day. I'm not sure where my place is on this, since I don't know them, and I don’t even know what neighbor it is, but I hate just sitting here doing nothing while a man is beating a woman. I don’t know what to do. Please help.

A. I have been on the receiving end of domestic violence. I have only been out for about 1yr and 3 months. I almost lost my children due to the issues. The best thing you can do is report it. Even though the person will never leave the situation until either someone intervenes, or they almost lose their life. They can get possibly die from it. domestic issues tend to escalate instead of subsiding. Also there is the problem that the person in the situation may have been threatened and their self esteem is usually in the gutter. I wasnt allowed out of my house and when I did go out I had to look at the ground. If my boyfriend thought that i was looking at someone male or female I usually got hit.

Q. Is “domestic violence” can be considered a medical issue? Is it curable? My partner is showing scary signs of violence…can it be treated with some sort of medication?

A. you can also tyr to get him into an anger management class,that might also help both of you.

More discussions about domestic violence
References in periodicals archive ?
The absence of gender differences and social patterning suggests that dating and relationship violence is becoming normalised for 16 to 19-year-olds.
A primary risk factor for relationship violence victimization and perpetration among traditional college-age students (18 to 24 years) is a misunderstanding of what constitutes healthy romantic relationships.
An exploratory factor analysis of the Choose Respect Attitudes Toward Relationship Violence Scale.
The One Love app, launched in September 2012, is a revolutionary tool that allows young victims of relationship violence to assess the threat and seek help.
Thus, mental health providers will also likely be expected to work with those same-sex couples involved in relationship violence.
School officials and students also have tried to make the culture on campus one in which people look out for each other and aren't afraid to report relationship violence.
Furthermore, there is a pressing need to address harassment, bullying, and relationship violence in our schools, which have a significant impact on a student's emotional and physical well-being as well as their academic success.
DESPITE A GREATER AWARENESS about violence on college campuses within the last decade, interpersonal violence (IPV), which includes sexual assault, relationship violence, and stalking, has remained a substantial problem among college students (Baum, 2005; Rennison, 2001, 2003).
Take Back the Halls: Ending Violence in Relationships and Schools (TBTH) is a teen dating violence prevention and community activism program designed to prevent relationship violence among teens.
Changes in the new policy include an emphasis on helping assault victims; elimination of mediation in assault cases; and the addition of new content on harassment, stalking, relationship violence, cyber-stalking, recording or transmitting sexual images, and the knowing transmittal of an STI.
His research interests focus on adolescent relationship violence and contraceptive use in this population.
If you are the parent of a teenager who is dating or in an exclusive relationship, you may want to hold off on assuming that your family hasn't been affected by relationship violence.

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