refeeding


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refeeding

 [re-fēd´ing]
restoration of normal nutrition after a period of fasting or starvation.
refeeding syndrome moderate to severe electrolyte and fluid shifts occurring during a period of refeeding; hypophosphatemia is common, and heart failure sometimes occurs.
References in periodicals archive ?
To assess the effects of prolonged fasting and subsequent refeeding on SL gene expression in liver, the hepatic transcription profiles of SL were investigated by using real-time PCR.
The attorney might recommend that a physician on the primary treatment team initiate a "medical hold"--an order that the patient may not leave against medical advice (AMA)--and then seek an emergency guardianship to permit medical treatment, such as refeeding.
(ii) Vitamin-B complex supplements to be prescribed for 21 days from the start of feeding to reduce the possibility of Wernicke's encephalopathy [32] as a consequence of refeeding syndrome and hyponatremia.
Table 3 Shifts in Parenting Change in parenting style "The refeeding process will take six hours per day, plus meal prep time, plus sessions with the team.
Refeeding syndrome in children with different clinical aetiology.
Effect of fasting and refeeding on growth and blood chemistry in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus L.
IGF-I has long been known to be regulated by nutrition and dysregulated in states of under- and over-nutrition, its serum concentrations falling in malnutrition and responding promptly to refeeding. This has led to interest in its utility as a nutritional biomarker.
Each time Simon binges after days without food there's a danger of 'refeeding syndrome', where the pancreas suddenly wakes up and the metabolism goes crazy.
Guidelines for refeeding an anorectic patient are very specific so adverse effects don't occur.
One of the dreaded complications of parenteral modalities involves introduction of refeeding. Refeeding of moderate to severely malnourished patients may result in "refeeding syndrome" which presents as a clinical constellation of fluid, micronutrient, electrolyte and vitamin imbalances.
When comparing the two groups, the rate of weight gain was almost double on higher- versus lower-calorie diets, and patients receiving more calories were hospitalized for an average of seven fewer days, without an increased risk of refeeding syndrome.