Reed-Sternberg cell

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Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd shtĕrn'bĕrg),
large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin disease; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cell frequently shows a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stûrn′bûrg′)
n.
A large, abnormal, binucleated or multinucleated B cell that is characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Reed-Sternberg cell

Etymology: Dorothy M. Reed, American pathologist, 1874-1964; Karl Sternberg, Austrian pathologist, 1872-1935
one of a number of large, abnormal, multinucleated reticuloendothelial cells in the lymphatic system found in Hodgkin's disease. The number and proportion of Reed-Sternberg cells identified are the basis for the histopathological classification of Hodgkin's disease.
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Reed-Sternberg cell

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd-stĕrn'bĕrg sel)
Large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin lymphoma; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cells frequently show a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).
Enlarge picture
REED-STERNBERG CELL: Reed-Sternberg cell in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stĕrn′bĕrg″)
[Dorothy Reed, U.S. pathologist, 1874–1964; Karl Sternberg, Aust. pathologist, 1872–1935]
A giant, malignant, multinucleated B lymphocyte, the presence of which is the pathologic hallmark of Hodgkin's disease.
See: illustration

Reed-Sternberg cell

A giant cell with paired, mirror-image nuclei that is a diagnostic feature of HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA and distinguishes it from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Dorothy M. Reed, 1874–1964, American pathologist; and Karl von Sternberg, 1872–1935, Austrian pathologist).

Reed-Sternberg cell

see Reed-Sternberg cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hodgkin's lymphoma in Indian children: prevalence and significance of Epstein-Barr virus detection in Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells.
It has been suggested that the pro-inflammatory cytokines from EBV infection contribute to the development of Reed-Sternberg cells.
Nevertheless, the confirmation of HL requires morphologic diagnosis of the neoplastic cells with the appropriate cellular background along with the result of immunophenotyping as cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells can be found in cases of B and T lymphomas, melanomas, sarcoma, and in some reactive conditions such as infectious mononucleosis, which are common in populations across the globe (6).
Demonstration of Epstein-Barr virus replication in Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin's disease.
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia with coexistent Hodgkin's disease: implications for the origin of the Reed-Sternberg cell.
Antibodies to this protein stain the germinal center cells in lymphoid follicles, follicular cells, and interfollicular cells in follicular lymphoma, large B-cell lymphomas, and Burkitt's lymphoma, and the majority of the Reed-Sternberg cells in nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin's disease.
Hodgkin's lymphoma caused by Hodgkin cells or reed-Sternberg cells (H-RS) and is one of the white blood cell malignancies.
7 In order to make the diagnosis of Hodgkin's, multinucleated Reed-Sternberg cells must be present.
Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a malignant proliferation of Reed-Sternberg cells and their variants, Hodgkin cells, in an inflammatory cellular background, and is characterized by a progressive painless enlargement of lymph nodes.
The absence of Reed-Sternberg cells helps distinguish Kimura's disease from Hodgkin's disease.