Reed-Sternberg cell

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Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd shtĕrn'bĕrg),
large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin disease; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cell frequently shows a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stûrn′bûrg′)
n.
A large, abnormal, binucleated or multinucleated B cell that is characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd-stĕrn'bĕrg sel)
Large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin lymphoma; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cells frequently show a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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REED-STERNBERG CELL: Reed-Sternberg cell in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stĕrn′bĕrg″)
[Dorothy Reed, U.S. pathologist, 1874–1964; Karl Sternberg, Aust. pathologist, 1872–1935]
A giant, malignant, multinucleated B lymphocyte, the presence of which is the pathologic hallmark of Hodgkin's disease.
See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Reed-Sternberg cell

A giant cell with paired, mirror-image nuclei that is a diagnostic feature of HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA and distinguishes it from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Dorothy M. Reed, 1874–1964, American pathologist; and Karl von Sternberg, 1872–1935, Austrian pathologist).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Even with appropriate tissue samples, it is important to note that Reed-Sternberg cells only represent a small proportion of the cells in adequate biopsy specimens.
It has been suggested that the pro-inflammatory cytokines from EBV infection contribute to the development of Reed-Sternberg cells. (10) On his initial colon biopsy, our patient had positive staining for the EBV oncoprotein, LMP1, which is frequently observed in HL.
The patient's bone marrow aspirations revealed the typical morphologic characteristics of Reed-Sternberg cells. Whereas, the trephine biopsy sections showed infiltration by scattered Reed-Sternberg cells and mononuclear Hodgkin cells in reactive background.
Cattaruzza et al., "Expression of CCR5 receptors on Reed-Sternberg cells and Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines: involvement of CCL5/Rantes in tumor cell growth and microenvironmental interactions," International Journal of Cancer, vol.
Miyazato et al., "Expression of CCL28 by Reed-Sternberg cells defines a major subtype of classical Hodgkin's disease with frequent infiltration of eosinophils and/or plasma cells," American Journal of Pathology, vol.
However, those cells that have an imbalance in pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins ratio could represent a transforming event rescuing pre-apoptotic GC B cells from apoptotic stimuli and finally could give rise to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells. They described bcl-2 and bak cytoplasmic expression in 83.3 and 92 per cent of the cases together with p53 nuclear expression 89.9 per cent of the cases.
These two markers are also commonly expressed by the Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma, but are uncommonly present in other forms of DLBCL.
In Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, a pathologic evaluation of ovarian tissue can detect Reed-Sternberg cells.
Indeed, EBV is suspected of playing a causative role in Hodgkin's lymphoma: as many as 70% of Reed-Sternberg cells are EBV-positive in HIV-infected patients, whereas, only about one-third of these malignancies in the general population are EBV-positive (26) (see Table).
Prominent features are scattered giant cells resembling Reed-Sternberg cells or virocytes with bizarre, vesicular nuclei, and macronucleoli.
Rajewsky, "Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells in Hodgkin's disease represent the outgrowth of a dominant tumor clone derived from (crippled) germinal center B cells," Journal of Experimental Medicine, vol.
The diagnosis of Hodgkin Lymphoma in lung is based on the recognition of diagnostic Reed-Sternberg cells with reactive cellular infiltrate in the background.