Reed-Sternberg cell


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Related to Reed-Sternberg cell: Hodgkin's lymphoma

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd shtĕrn'bĕrg),
large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin disease; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cell frequently shows a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stûrn′bûrg′)
n.
A large, abnormal, binucleated or multinucleated B cell that is characteristic of Hodgkin lymphoma.

Reed-Sternberg cell

Etymology: Dorothy M. Reed, American pathologist, 1874-1964; Karl Sternberg, Austrian pathologist, 1872-1935
one of a number of large, abnormal, multinucleated reticuloendothelial cells in the lymphatic system found in Hodgkin's disease. The number and proportion of Reed-Sternberg cells identified are the basis for the histopathological classification of Hodgkin's disease.
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Reed-Sternberg cell

Reed-Stern·berg cell

(rēd-stĕrn'bĕrg sel)
Large transformed lymphocytes, probably B cell in origin, generally regarded as pathognomonic of Hodgkin lymphoma; a typical cell has a pale-staining acidophilic cytoplasm and one or two large nuclei showing marginal clumping of chromatin and unusually conspicuous deeply acidophilic nucleoli; binucleate Reed-Sternberg cells frequently show a mirror-image form (mirror-image cell).
Enlarge picture
REED-STERNBERG CELL: Reed-Sternberg cell in Hodgkin Lymphoma

Reed-Sternberg cell

(rēd′stĕrn′bĕrg″)
[Dorothy Reed, U.S. pathologist, 1874–1964; Karl Sternberg, Aust. pathologist, 1872–1935]
A giant, malignant, multinucleated B lymphocyte, the presence of which is the pathologic hallmark of Hodgkin's disease.
See: illustration

Reed-Sternberg cell

A giant cell with paired, mirror-image nuclei that is a diagnostic feature of HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA and distinguishes it from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (Dorothy M. Reed, 1874–1964, American pathologist; and Karl von Sternberg, 1872–1935, Austrian pathologist).

Reed-Sternberg cell

see Reed-Sternberg cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
This has allowed detection of diploid, hyperdiploid, and aneuploid peaks, with aneuploid peaks maintaining their identity on multiple biopsies, supporting a hypothesis that Hodgkin lymphoma may contain multiple or serial subpopulations of clonal Reed-Sternberg cells simultaneously.
These authors suggested that the 2 diseases were likely clonally unrelated, since the expert opinion at that time was that Reed-Sternberg cells were not B cells--an opinion now considered to be incorrect.
Hodgkin's lymphoma in Indian children: prevalence and significance of Epstein-Barr virus detection in Hodgkin's and Reed-Sternberg cells.
8,9) How a rising CD4 count increases the risk of HL is unknown, but it is hypothesized that CD4 cells are recruited to Reed-Sternberg cells, and within this microenvironment, CD4 cells secrete growth factors that promote the proliferation and expansion of Reed-Sternberg cells.
The bone marrow biopsy showed infiltration by scattered Reed-Sternberg cells and mononuclear Hodgkin cells in reactive background consisting of small lymphocytes, epithelioid histiocytes, and occasional neutrophils and eosinophils (Figure 3).
Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells represent an expansion of a single clone originating from a germinal center B-cell with functional immunoglobulin gene rearrangements but defective immunoglobulin transcription.
The Reed-Sternberg cells are binucleated or multinucleated and must be present in order for the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease to be made.
However, those cells that have an imbalance in pro-and anti-apoptotic proteins ratio could represent a transforming event rescuing pre-apoptotic GC B cells from apoptotic stimuli and finally could give rise to Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells.
The expression of the Hodgkin's disease associated antigen Ki-1 in reactive and neoplastic lymphoid tissue: evidence that Reed-Sternberg cells and histiocytic malignancies are derived from activated lymphoid cells.
In Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, a pathologic evaluation of ovarian tissue can detect Reed-Sternberg cells.
This correlates with a previous study that detected gp350/220 mRNA by RT-PCR in only 1 of 10 biopsies, whereas the immediate-early protein ZEBRA was detected in Reed-Sternberg cells in 3 of 40 biopsies of Hodgkin disease, confirming that viral replication in EBV-associated Hodgkin disease is a rare event (19, 28).