wine

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Related to Red wines: White wines

wine

(wīn),
1. The fermented juice of a plant product (most commonly the grape), consumed as a beverage. Synonym(s): vinous liquor
2. A group of preparations consisting of a solution of one or more medicinal substances in wine, usually white wine because of its comparative lack of tannin. No specific wines are officially designated for such use, however.
[Fr. vin; L. vinum]
An alcoholic beverage made from fermented grapes. In moderation, wine consumption lowers the risk of heart disease, an effect attributed to polyphenols in the grape skins—which is thus higher in red wines—including resveratrol, which is optimally absorbed in the mouth

wine

(wīn) [L. vinum, wine]
1. Fermented juice of any fruit, usually made from grapes and containing 10% to 15% alcohol. Taken in moderation (1 or 2 glasses a night) it is part of the Mediterranean diet.

red wine

An alcoholic beverage made from pressed grapes, which contains polyphenolic antioxidants. Consumption of red wine, not in excess of 1 to 2 glasses per day, is associated with reduced risk of coronary artery disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is despite popular opinion, which suggest red wine should always be served at room temperature.
As part of the study, a team of researchers extracted the tannins from a dry wine called Cabernet Sauvignon, and a less-dry red wine called Cabernet Sauvignon.
This explains why grapes of any color can be made into a "colorless" white wine, but only grapes with deeply-tinted skins can be used to make a wine dark enough to be called a red wine. In fact, the main differences between red and white wines do not derive as much from the type of grapes used as they do from the different processes by which we ferment the two styles.
Red wines lose their youthful hues as they slowly oxidize-moving from purple to blood red to garnet to rusty orange-but they also get paler over time.
Conventional measurements overestimate free and molecular S[O.sub.2] in red wines and are not fit for practical purposes.
This challenges the notion that red wines, like cabernet sauvignon, merlot, and pinot noir, are better for the heart than white wines, such as chardonnay, sauvignon blanc, and Riesling.
I ran a wine tasting the other week - all reds - and a chap pointed to his wife and said: " she doesn't like red wine".
Researchers screened commercially available red wines and grape juices at 40% to 100% levels against the pathogens.
The carnivorous nature of the feast really demanded some red wine. It certainly caused a tad of consternation when I politely requested an ice bucket for the warmish rouge.
Inside a glass of red wine. A high prevalence of hypersensitivity symptoms after intake of red wine have been reported, according to a June 2008 article in Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology.
For by-the-glass service, red wines should be kept at cellar temperature and pulled just prior to service.
The specific objectives of this research were to confirm bactericidal activity using the pour plate technique, and to investigate the effects of red wine and grape juice polyphenols against these pathogens and the probiotics L.