red flag

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Lab medicine An indicator—e.g., an asterisk—that is usually printed in red and generated in the lab, when an analyte’s value falls ‘out of range’—i.e., above or below the lab’s predetermined values for normal
Paediatrics A sentinel finding in a child’s development—e.g., ‘missing’ critical milestones, which may suggest a more extensive disease process warranting investigation
Public safety A forecast warning issued by the US National Weather Service to inform regional firefighting and land management agencies that conditions are ideal for wildland fire ignition and propagation
Scispeak An article in a peer-reviewed scientific journal which, when published, reaches startling conclusions that are likely to evoke wide interest and therefore appear in the lay news media—i.e., major newspapers and magazines—and potentially be reported less for their scientific value than for their sensationalist impact
Social medicine A popular term for any subtle sign—e.g., physical findings and behavioural patterns—that may indicate domestic abuse

'red flag'

Pediatrics A sentinel finding which may indicate a more extensive disease process. See Developmental red flag Science journalism An article in a peer-reviewed scientific journal which, when published, reaches startling conclusions that are likely to evoke wide interest and therefore appear in the lay news media–eg, Washington Post, NY Times, and others, which may be reported less for their scientific value than for their sensationalist impact. See 'Media epidemic. ', Peer-reviewed journal Social medicine A popular term for subtle physical findings and behavioral patterns may indicate domestic abuse. See Domestic violence, Wife-abuser.
References in periodicals archive ?
On Valentine's Day, if you see your date exhibiting any of the red flags, run away from the restaurant or bolt out of the motel as fast as you can.
Auditors' perception of the effectiveness of red flags was observed by Moyes (2011), Moyes, Young and Mohamed (2013), Moyes, Lin, Landry and Vicdan (2006), who offer relevant results on fraud in financial reports; nevertheless, they do not discuss the benefits of warning signs in the prevention and detection of fraud referring to the personal aspects of organizational members, of internal controls and of management, amongst others, that occur in the internal environment.
But like gut feelings, red flags can help people on both sides of the coin avoid making a dreadful mistake that costs them time and resources.
Red flag #2: Staged accident with multiple claimants
On April 10, 2013, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission jointly adopted new identity theft red flag regulations, which are being imposed pursuant to their respective authority under the Dodd-Frank Act and the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA).
After identifying employees exhibiting these characteristics and red flags, the next step in proving fraudulent employee behavior is to perform a fraud risk assessment, including an internal control analysis involving the identified employees' job duties, authorities and access and control of assets.
The American Medical Association and other physician groups are hopeful that the clarification will be enough to convince officials at the Federal Trade Commission to exempt physicians from the Red Flags rule.
The Federal Trade Commission has put together a guide to help businesses comply with the Red Flags Rule, which has a December 31 deadline for all affected companies.
According to the Red Flags Rule, an identity-theft prevention program must:
Lawmakers are considering legislation that would exempt doctors, dentists, and veterinarians from the Red Flags rule.
Regardless of the lawsuit's outcome, the latest enforcement extension means that even though the red flags rule technically is in effect now, enforcement will be postponed for physicians and other covered businesses until at least January 1, 2011.
Red flag II; a guide to solving serious pathology of the spine.