reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.
References in periodicals archive ?
What began as a relatively harmless social club quickly became intricately involved in the bitter and violent struggles of the Reconstruction era. Within a year of its founding, the Klan had spread well beyond Tennessee into all the former Confederate states and Kentucky.
Harold Benjamin (1893-1969) was arguably the most thoughtful and popular American educator during the world-wide Depression of the 1930s and the first decade of the post-WWII reconstruction era. Benjamin's widespread experience as teacher-administrator-consultant, formal training in education at the University of Oregon (B.A., 1921; M.A., 1924) and Stanford University (Ph.D., 1927), and editorship of the McGraw Hill education series (about 120 books 1936-1966) made his the most recognized American voice for educational reform at home and abroad for nearly three decades.
We learn--each is cited as a separate accomplishment--that the first Hispanic governor, the first African American senator (Reconstruction Era, of course), the first female mayor, the first Jewish Cabinet member, the first Hispanic senator, and the first Asian American senator were all Republicans.
Harding was among 50 scholars from across the nation selected to participate in two prestigious workshops over the summer: the Fannie Lou Hamer Institute of American Democracy workshop "Landmarks of American Democracy: From Freedom Summer to the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike," (funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities), and the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History's summer seminar on the Reconstruction era with Eric Foner of Columbia University (funded by the Gilder Lehrman Institute).
Moses, scion of an old Charleston Jewish family, has been vilified as the "Robber Governor." Although Ginsberg admits that the Radical Republican was not above graft, he places Moses's crimes in the perspective of the widespread corruption of the Reconstruction era. He credits the governor as a true reformer who practiced what he preached in terms of black equality and as a person who participated in perhaps the first black-Jewish coalition.
Since the late 1980s, the Reconstruction era has received a great deal of scholarly attention.
THE RECONSTRUCTION ERA (0761421815, $23.95) covers the move from slavery to free labor, THE SLAVE TRADE AND MIDDLE PASSAGE (0761421769, $23.95) surveys the process by which slavery came to be a popular trade item in the new world, AFRICA: A LOOK BACK (0761421483, $23.95) provides an excellent basis of African history upon which to base the next volumes covering African-American transitions, SLAVERY AND RESISTANCE (0761421785, $23.95) surveys slavery in colonial America and plantation life, and THE CIVIL WAR (0761421793, $23.95) charts events of the war tied to the breaking of slavery and the evolution of civil rights in America.
In The Day Freedom Died, author Charles Lane masterfully details the dynamics of the post-Civil War Reconstruction era in Louisiana.
He shows that the thesis of the film was broadly consistent with the works of the "Dunning School" of historians, who presented a "tragic legend" of the Reconstruction Era that has continued to exist in some realms of the popular imagination, and thus invokes the ongoing debate about the medium of film as a tool of the historical discipline.
Regional newspapers reported that the wife of George Henry White, the last Black congressman from the Reconstruction era, had received a shipment of rifles.
Griffith for his 1915 film The Birth of a Nation, the editors of Nineteenth Century Theatre and Film append this bibliography which lists a) further sources of national, especially Southern, history upon which Griffith drew; b) accounts and interpretations of how Griffith treated his sources as he developed his film; c) responses to his film; d) other accounts of early twentieth century racial politics; e) other near-contemporary films which depict either the Civil War and/or the Reconstruction Era.
The Reconstruction era witnessed challenges to states' (mostly Southern) laws against interracial marriage based on the 14th amendment's equal protection clause, (71) setting the pattern that would endure until the 1960s.

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