reconcentration


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reconcentration

(rē-kŏn″sĕn-trā′shŭn)
The process of repeated concentration.
References in periodicals archive ?
All told, tens of thousands of Cubans would die because of the reconcentration policy.
It is impossible to comprehend the successive failure of the various industrial programmes to curb European specialization, the persistent policy of fragmenting market players even after reconcentration began in the US, and the total lack of response to successive failures, without taking into account a triple feature of European construction.
The Americans had an urgent need for impact projects; despite the Sedition Act of 1901, the Brigandage and Reconcentration Laws of 1903, Filipino "insurgents" were not being quelled with thrilling briskness.
In this way, British tactics resembled Spanish General Valeriano Weyler's earlier "reconcentration" campaign to gather Cuba's rural population in fortified towns and isolate civilians from guerrilla insurgents.
Significant trends include the widespread shift from authoritarian to democratic regimes, the urbanization and reconcentration of populations and the regional emergence onto a global marketplace.
And in the War against Spain, the motivating force was not our universalist liberal ideology but rather our compassion for the horrible suffering of Cuban citizens forced into "reconcentration" camps (261, 151, 169, 255, 256, 194, 391).
Dispatching theorists left (Franco Modigliani) and right (Vilfredo Pareto), Piketty's story closes at the end of Part Three with the processes driving the reconcentration of wealth and the return to a society where the arbitrary luck of inheritance decides individual life chances.
The resistance did not last long and the people behind it gave in to the pressure of "military campaigns and reconcentration of the inhabitants."
The last development has come about due to a reconcentration of state government activity in the capital rather than growth in government itself.
Perhaps more topically, Hoar accurately noted that we had engaged in "the horror of the water torture"--today's "water boarding." We had employed "reconcentration camps" and killed thousands of civilians.
Spain had been fighting an indigenous independence movement in its Cuban colony, outraging Americans with what they saw as inexcusable brutality, including the herding of civilians into "reconcentrados" ("reconcentration camps") to separate them from the insurgents.