reciprocal

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reciprocal

/re·cip·ro·cal/ (re-sip´ro-k'l″)
1. being equivalent or complementary.
2. inversely related; opposing.

reciprocal

(rĭ-sĭp′rə-kəl)
adj.
1. Physiology Of or relating to a neuromuscular phenomenon in which the excitation of one group of muscles is accompanied by the inhibition of another.
2. Genetics Of or designating a pair of crosses in which the male or female parent in one cross is of the same genotype or phenotype as the complementary female or male parent in the other cross.

re·cip′ro·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), re·cip′ro·cal·ness (-kəl-nĭs) n.
re·cip′ro·cal·ly adv.

reciprocal

(rĭ-sĭp′rō-kăl) [L. reciprocus, alternate]
Interchangeable.

reciprocal

mathematically the reciprocal of x is 1/x. See also translocation.

reciprocal crosses
matings of two phenotypes in which both the male and the female of both phenotypes are crossed, usually to detect sex linkage.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analogously, those structures where the reciprocal marker derives from a symmetric nominal like 'comrade', 'fellow', 'mate', 'companion', 'friend' can also be assigned to the pronominal subtype.
The reciprocal markers involved in the fourth strategy differ strikingly from the ones used in the other three in having more semantic substance and in manifesting an NP-like behavior.
As is shown by the preceding two examples, reciprocal anaphors inflect for categories such as person, gender, number, and case in some languages, but are invariant in others.
Historically, such reciprocal markers derive from bipartite quantifiers or demonstratives.
Note that the simplex reciprocal anaphor is marked for the plural in Finnish, in contrast to the bipartite one:
If these four strategies of forming reciprocal constructions are compared, some interesting observations and generalizations emerge.
The reciprocal anaphors or quantifiers seem to have no other use in many languages, whereas polysemy is the standard situation for reciprocal affixes and reciprocal pronouns.
The observation made in (a) hardly needs any supporting evidence: Reciprocal anaphors are free forms and affixes are employed in strategy I.
Moreover, all reciprocal markers that are licensed in genitive (possessive) phrases are instances of strategy IV.
The wider range of possible interpretations for the shorter and more economical reciprocal markers is simply a specific manifestation of Zipf's Economy Principles (Zipf 1949).
So far, very little has been reported on implicational connections between variant properties of reciprocal constructions.
It is against the background of these preliminary typological findings that we will take a closer look at reciprocal constructions in German and Japanese.