recidivist

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recidivist

 [re-sid´ĭ-vist]
a person who tends to relapse, especially one who tends to return to criminal habits after treatment or punishment.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·cid·i·vist

(rē-sid'i-vist),
A person who tends toward recidivation.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

re·cid·i·vist

(rĕ-sid'i-vist)
A person who tends toward recidivation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

recidivist

(rē-sĭd′ĭ-vĭst)
1. A confirmed criminal.
2. A patient, esp. one with mental illness, who has repeated relapses into behavior marked by antisocial acts.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
Retributivists rely on the progressive loss of mitigation theory, while those who adopt a utilitarian theory of punishment rely on the supposed instrumental good effects (such as incapacitation and deterrence) of punishing recidivists more sternly.
The actual number of individual women imprisoned was much lower as over 70% of the female inmate population was recidivist. If each woman is counted only once, the average yearly number of individuals admitted was about 250.
Sixty of these were classified as recidivists and included in the study.
Thus, after the exclusion of the high-error participants, the final effective numbers of participants for the IATs comprised 68 nonoffenders, 31 onset-offenders, and 26 recidivists.
Regarding the recidivist inmates, the assessment was carried out before and after the crime was committed.
This jump in punishment for non-traffic related offenses is a new and relatively rare method of punishing misdemeanor recidivists. (44) But the stage is set: misdemeanor violations, once only punishable by a maximum of one year in jail, (45) can now trigger felony charges and consequences if the criminal history conditions are satisfied.
In that regard, the study included 619 youngsters facing their primary incarceration and 267 recidivists (individuals with more than one conviction).
(27.) See Zimring et al., supra note 26, at 4 (discussing ballot initiative proposed by Mike Reynolds calling for enhanced punishments for recidivists).
What is indisputable, is that the more recidivists you incarcerate, the less crime is committed.
There were "no confirmed or suspected recidivists among detainees transferred during this administration, although we recognize the ongoing risk that detainees could engage in such activity," his letter said.
This poses a particular threat for recidivists; because various HIV strains are mixing and mutating, people who go in and out of prison (and therefore on and off treatment), are increasing their chances of succumbing to the virus, Potter said.
If law-abiding motorists are dutifully - if a little grudgingly - paying then every effort should be made to ensure recidivists are not allowed to get away with it?