recidivism

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recidivism

 [re-sid´ĭ-vizm]
a tendency to relapse into a previous condition, disease, or pattern of behavior, particularly a return to criminal behavior.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

re·cid·i·vism

(rē-sid'i-vizm),
The tendency of a person toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

re·cid·i·vism

, recidivity (rĕ-sidi-vizm, -si-divi-tē)
A tendency toward recidivation.
[L. recidivus, recurring]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
To contain the recidivism rates, Trump administration reviewed and monitored policies of states like Kansas and Kentucky, which have improved prison reformation systems.
Recidivism studies have repeatedly demonstrated that people convicted of violent crimes generally have lower recidivism rates than other types of offenders.
Such programming must increase to bring down the high recidivism rates long observed among US prisoners.
Researchers generally conclude that correctional education has effectively reduced the recidivism rate among released offenders and decreased the over-all cost of incarceration.
I argue that the manner in which costs of sentencing, risk assessments, and recidivism rates are presented has the effect of systematically overstating the social costs of prison.
Changes in recidivism rates comparing two, 3-year periods, 1999-2002 and 2004-2007.
A statistically significant effect was noted in recidivism rates across the treatment and control groups, [chi square](5) = 14.64, p = .012, [PHI] = .25, indicative of a small to moderate effect size.
The estimated postrelease recidivism rate difference between the ACJC and comparison groups within the three-year period was 17.8 percent (34.4 percent versus 52.2 percent for the ACJC participants and the comparison group, respectively).
Quirk's institution had the lowest recidivism rates in the Western world!
Based on baseline year 2003 ex-inmate data with a three-year tracking period, recidivism was operationalized as the first rearrest after release in two ways: (1) percentage of released inmates who were rearrested to the ACJ within three years (recidivism rate) and (2) survival time, defined as the total number of days elapsed between release and rearrest.
According to IDOC data, the state's overall recidivism rate dropped from 37.8 in 2007 to 37.4 percent in 2008, marking the third consecutive year the rate declined.
The program was initiated by two Wesleyan undergraduates, based on Bureau of Prisons data that indicated the more education an inmate received, the lower the recidivism rate. The Wesleyan program is unique in Connecticut, which has the highest incarceration rate in the Northeast.