recession

(redirected from Recessions)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

recession

 [re-sesh´un]
the drawing away of a tissue or part from its normal position.
gingival recession the drawing back of the gingivae from the necks of the teeth, with exposure of root surfaces.

re·ces·sion

(rē-sesh'ŭn),
A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction.
[L. recessio (see recessus)]

re·ces·sion

(rĕ-sesh'ŭn)
1. A withdrawal or retreating.
See also: retraction
2. Surgical operation in which an extaocular muscle is detached from the globe and reattached posteriorly.
3. Loss of gingiva on a tooth apically; measurement is made using a probe; findings are recorded as attachment loss.

recession

Surgical retroplacement of a part, especially the insertion of a muscle so as to weaken its action.

recession 

A surgical procedure used in strabismus in which an extraocular muscle is removed from its insertion and repositioned elsewhere on the globe, posteriorly to weaken it and anteriorly to strengthen it (called advancement procedure). See resection; strabismus surgery.

gin·gi·val re·ces·sion

(jinji-văl rĕ-seshŭn)
Apical migration of the gingiva along the tooth surface, with exposure of the tooth surface.
Synonym(s): gingival atrophy, gingival resorption.
References in periodicals archive ?
recessions. The B-B method is unlikely to exactly identify the NBER-defined recessions, as the process used by the Business Cycle Dating Committee is somewhat subjective.
The durations of those state recessions that accompanied the Great Recession ranged from five months in North Dakota to 64 months in Michigan.
The size of a bubble represents the drop in GDP during the preceding recession. We expect to see a similar relationship between these variables over the course of the recovery as they had during the recessions, though with the opposite sign.
Stovall says there are two key factors missing from the current economic landscape and from forecasts that argue against an economic recession even if there is a recession in profits: the U.S.
For many nonprofits a recession is a drawn-out period of painful cuts and adjustments and reductions in revenue and then it's over.
Ball suggests that recessions sharply reduce capital accumulation, have long-term effects on employment--largely through lower labor force participation--and may slow the growth of total-factor productivity.
The Great Recession disproportionately affected household wealth, unemployment rates, and health insurance coverage of minorities.
Nevertheless, Clarksons Platou warns of a "real risk of stagnation in container trade" in a recession scenario and projects that "based on historical regression [analysis for the years] 2009-18 ...
-- Financial: The most consistent factor in recent recessions -- bubbles and risky markets -- are in principle a major threat, the Goldman analysts write, but they seem "to be in abeyance at present, partly because of crisis-induced caution on the part of households, firms, and regulators."
They said reliable yardsticks of an impending recession are nonfarm payrolls, consumer strength, manufacturing and aggregate indicators of growth such as those the Conference Board publishes.
2.2 A probit model using the yield curve to predict recessions
Schwandt and von Wachter point to the fact that previous studies had only looked at the effects that entering the labor market during a recession had on college graduates.