receptive field

(redirected from Receptive fields)

receptive field

that part of the retina of which the photoreceptors (rods and cones) pertain to a single optic nerve fiber. The response of a neuron to stimulation of its receptive field depends on the type of neuron and the part of the field that is illuminated; an "on-center" neuron is stimulated by light falling at the center of its receptive field and inhibited by light falling at the periphery; an "off-center" neuron reacts in exactly the opposite fashion; that is, it is inhibited by light falling at the center of its receptive field. In either case, the net response depends on a complex switching action in the retina. When an entire receptive field is equally illuminated, the response of receptors at the center of the field predominates.

receptive field

A description of the effective stimuli of a given neuron. For sensory receptor neurons, the receptive field is the type of effective stimulation (e.g., light, sound, mechanical pressure) and the range of sensitive locations (e.g., center of visual field, left auditory field, tip of right thumb).
See also: field

receptive field

an area of the body surface over which a single sensory receptor, or its afferent nerve fiber, is capable of sensing stimuli. In some body area, e.g. face, ears, front paws, the sensitive areas are small; over the back they are larger.
References in periodicals archive ?
One interesting feature of these neurons is that they have large spatially organized receptive fields, yet can be activated by pulling a single hair, noted Chesler.
1964) Receptive fields of optic tract axons and lateral geniculate cells: peripheral extent and barbiturate sensitivity.
13,14) The receptive fields of neurons in the primary visual cortex are such that images with 1 / f structure produce a 'sparse' cortical response.
His team has found that the upper half of the visual field is represented in the SC by receptive fields that are much smaller, more finely tuned to the spatial structure of received images, and more sensitive to image contrast.
These receptive fields of visual cortex contain multiple bands of excitatory and inhibitory areas which act as line detectors.
Key themes include the history of Gestalt theory and it relevance to contemporary neuroscience, the relationship between perceptive and receptive fields, the spatiotemporal unity of perception, self-organizing properties of the visual field, the role of attention and perceptual grouping in forming non-retinotopic representations, figural distortions following adaptation to spatial patterns, illusory changes of brightness in spatial patterns, the function of motion illusions as a tool to study Gestalt principles in vision, conflicting theories of color vision and the neural basis of it, the role of color in figure-ground segmentation, chromatic assimilation of visual art and perception, and the phenomena of colored shadows.
He said that in earlier stages of processing, these windows - known as receptive fields - are small and only have access to info within a restricted region of space.
Baumgartner claimed perception of the ID was the result of lateral inhibition in the receptive fields of ganglion cells.
Rabins suggested that the de-enervation hallucinations resulted from the spontaneous discharge of cells in the altered cortical receptive fields.
Some chapter topics are brain vesicular monoamine transporters and apoptosis, semantically mediated integration of cognition, control of cortical synaptic receptive fields by neuromodulation and patterned sensory input, links between Down syndrome and Alzheimer's, and mind wandering in the default state.
On the left side of the figure, are depicted the overlapping bull's-eye-shaped LGN receptive fields along the bottom, which project up to the dots representing the neurons at the top.