Rebound headache

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Rebound headache

A type of primary headache caused by overuse of pain relievers. It is also known as analgesic abuse headache.
Mentioned in: Tension Headache
References in periodicals archive ?
Analgesic medications--acetaminophen (Tylenol) and medications that combine acetaminophen, aspirin, and caffeine (for example, Excedrin)--put you at greater risk for rebound headaches than NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn).
But all of these are also prone to causing "rebound headaches" if taken too frequently.
Overuse of painkillers for headaches can, ironically, lead to rebound headaches.
REBOUND HEADACHES People who use acute pain-relief medicine more than two or three times a week, or more than 10 days out of the month, can set off a cycle called medication-overuse headaches (MOH).
The overuse of caffeine containing analgesics causes rebound headaches, he added.
LipiGesic M's feverfew and ginger gel is non-drowsy and non-habit forming and is not associated with rebound headaches.
It can create what we call rebound headaches," she said.
Drug induced headaches are referred to as rebound headaches and are a result of regular use of pain relieving medications.
Those who regularly take painkillers to get relief from headaches may suffer from rebound headaches and become dependent on pills.
These medications come with a high risk of rebound headaches and other side effects, however, so they are not used often.
"Avoid painkillers more than one day a week as these can cause rebound headaches. If migraines are still a problem, ask your doctor about preventive drugs."
Painkillers are fine occasionally but if you're prone to this sort of headache, it's best not to take them too regularly as this can cause rebound headaches. Instead, concentrate on stress-relieving techniques such as exercise, massaging your temples and relaxation.