rebound effect


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rebound effect

 The worsening of Sx when a drug–eg, a decongestant, is discontinued, attributed to tissue dependence on the agent
References in periodicals archive ?
"That just shows there may be a rebound effect when you have a statin on board and you are controlling your LDL cholesterol production through the liver," said Zaric, who wasn't part of the study.
We're currently looking at the 'rebound effect' of energy efficiency measures in industry.
That's what we call 'the rebound effect' - which is also noticeable in people who take a lot of sleeping pills.
Upon discontinuing denosumab, there's a marked rebound effect in which levels of bone turnover markers rise for 2 years, and some or all of the BMD that was gained is lost (J Clin Endocrinol Metab.
In the present context, this represents the rebound effect. However, generation inputs per unit of delivered electricity have fallen, so that for the level of electricity generation to rise, then e > x.
'Many people think alcohol is a good inducer of sleep, but there's a rebound effect,' said senior study author Dr Jose Ordovas, a researcher at CNIC and a senior scientist at Tufts University.
"They were well beaten last week, so there'll be a rebound effect from that," said Healy.
The widespread use of aspirin and the possibility of a rebound effect with discontinuation highlights a need for more research.
Medicated nasal sprays, meanwhile, contain active ingredients such as oxymetazoline hydrochloride or fluticasone propionate which is a well-established cause of "rebound effect" in which the more of it a person uses the more one needs to use in order to get the same effect.
Denosumab discontinuation is associated with a rebound effect which manifests by a severe increase of bone turnover markers and a rapid loss of BMD.
At present, the most common are the rebound effect, free riders, and spillover effects.