primary gain

(redirected from Real gain)
Also found in: Financial.

pri·mar·y gain

interpersonal, social, or financial advantages from the conversion of emotional stress directly into demonstrably organic illnesses (for example, hysterical blindness or paralysis). Compare: secondary gain.

primary gain

Psychiatry An emotional gain directly from illness–eg, alleviation of anxiety in neurosis by 'converting' emotions into an organic disease, a defense mechanism–eg, hysterical dysphonia. Cf Secondary gain.

pri·mar·y gain

(prī'mar-ē gān)
Interpersonal, social, or financial advantages from the conversion of emotional stress directly into illness (e.g., hysterical blindness or paralysis).
Compare: secondary gain

Primary gain

The immediate relief from guilt, anxiety, or other unpleasant feelings that a patient derives from a symptom.
Mentioned in: Somatoform Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
The middle group, those between the 50th and 60th percentile on the horizontal axis, shows real gains with income almost doubling in the two decades.
"The conspiracy involved over 800 giros to a value of pounds 250,000 and that's all real gain - real cash received by you and your colleagues."
But the real gain for IBM is a 10-year outsourcing contract to run Danske Bank's worldwide IT operations that comes with the deal.
But implementation of the programs is limited and no real gain or progress to drive down incidents and injuries is present.
This should mean that the increase in orders in June 2004 was finally a real gain as it was the first increase this year where there was not a decline in orders in the prior year."
Of course we enjoyed the many sites and tastes of New Orleans, but the real gain came from attending the PIMA Conference.
With the national economy expected to grow at a somewhat improved pace in 2002, real restaurant industry sales (adjusted for inflation) should rise 1.4% compared with a 0.8% real gain in 2001.
There has been "a real gain in merchandising concepts compared to the casual approach of the 1930s (but still behind the accepted standards in many industries)."
The real gain in the nation's eating & drinking place sector, said the Fair Lawn, NJ-based trade association, is substantially higher than the at-home sector.
Even the best accounts offer a real gain of only about two per cent a year.
They lead us to wonder as well whether the march of progress, putting the dynamo or the computer at the centre of our so-called civilization, has meant a real gain or only an illusory one: men and women ought still to testify to the existence of realities transcending material ones.