Reach to Recovery

Reach to Re·cov·ery

(rēch rĕ-kŏv'ĕr-ē)
An American Cancer Society-sponsored program in which breast cancer survivors, who have made a full adjustment to their breast cancer treatment, volunteer their time and services to help women who are diagnosed with breast cancer and their families.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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The American Cancer Society Reach to Recovery program (see What You Should Know) can put you in touch with a local volunteer who can provide emotional support.
At the 17th Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference held in Cape Town, South Africa in March 2013, a meeting was held with the Deputy Minister of Health to advocate and lobby for a breast health policy.
The Reach to Recovery program helps newly diagnosed patients cope with their breast cancer experience.
I had to wait six months before I could be trained as a Reach to Recovery team member.
Congregational Church Women's Fellowship, Harrington Memorial Hospital Auxiliary, Reach to Recovery which was an organization for breast cancer survivors, and other local groups.
One program, Reach to Recovery, provides one-on-one support for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer by matching each woman with an ACS volunteer who has had a similar cancer experience.
"I finished intravenous treatment in 2006 and I wanted to do some volunteer work for Reach To Recovery but I wasn't allowed until you are five years over.
Kyriakidou was awarded by the Breast Cancer Network of Australia when she attended the 15th UICC (International Union Against Cancer) Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference in Brisbane, Australia last week.
Chodaba said that she was very fortunate that her mother was a longtime survivor and a Reach to Recovery volunteer with the American Cancer Society.
In Reach To Recovery: Depression Anonymous by Marilyn Patterson (a Twelve Step Certified Counselor and Adjunct Professotr, Hosuton Community College Southwest, Stafford Center, Texas) addresses the mental/emotional condition of chronic depression, a condition that antidepressant medication can offer no relief to 20% of afflicted men and women.
She also serves in the church's soup kitchen on Saturdays, takes part in a Volunteers in Medicine Clinic on Fridays and frequently works as a Reach to Recovery volunteer with the American Cancer Society.
The Society's nationwide Reach to Recovery patient-to-patient support program was begun in 1969.