Raynaud phenomenon


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Related to Raynaud phenomenon: Buerger's disease

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō'),
spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers become variably red, white, and blue.

Raynaud phenomenon

Raynaud's disease Cardiovascular disease A condition characterized by vasospasm of small vessels of the fingers and toes, resulting in skin discoloration Etiology Extreme temperatures–especially cold or hot or emotional events; initially, digits involved turn white because of ↓ blood supply, then blue because of prolonged hypoxia, then red, when the blood vessels reopen, causing a local flushing

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō' fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers become variably red, white, and blue.
See also: Raynaud syndrome
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RAYNAUD PHENOMENON

Raynaud phenomenon

Intermittent attacks of pallor or cyanosis of the small arteries and arterioles of the fingers as the result of inadequate arterial blood flow. This condition is associated with scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, Buerger disease, nerve entrapment, and anorexia-bulimia. The signs, symptoms, and treatment are identical to those of Raynaud disease. illustration;

Raynaud,

Maurice, French physician, 1834-1881.
Raynaud disease - Synonym(s): Raynaud syndrome
Raynaud gangrene - Synonym(s): Raynaud syndrome
Raynaud phenomenon - spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold.
Raynaud sign - Synonym(s): acrocyanosis
Raynaud syndrome - idiopathic paroxysmal bilateral cyanosis of the digits. Synonym(s): Raynaud disease; Raynaud gangrene; symmetric asphyxia

Ray·naud phe·nom·e·non

(rā-nō' fĕ-nom'ĕ-non)
Spasm of the digital arteries, with blanching and numbness or pain of the fingers, often precipitated by cold. Fingers are variably colored red, white, and blue.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intravenous iloprost infusion in patients with Raynaud phenomenon secondary to systemic sclerosis.
Losartan therapy for Raynaud phenomenon and scleroderma.
After the 10th infusion, she developed bilateral secondary Raynaud phenomenon that followed a typical discoloration sequence and resulted in a necrotic lesion at the tip of one finger.
The Raynaud phenomenon disappeared and the necrotic lesion healed after pembrolizumab was stopped and prednisolone treatment was started, they added.
Herein, we present two patients with clinical diagnosis of POTS and two different cooccurrences of Raynaud phenomenon, homocystinuria, and POTS.
Meanwhile bruising and coldness in her hands pointing out Raynaud phenomenon were observed.
There are a couple factors that may have contributed to our patient's unique presentation of Raynaud phenomenon followed by DVT and PE.
(2,3,7) There is also documentation of thrombotic occlusions presenting as Raynaud phenomenon (which was our patient's initial complaint).
In conclusion, (a) we confirmed that a high percentage of patients with anti-RNP antibodies have Raynaud phenomenon; (b) assay systems composed of recombinant antigens may miss rare samples that contain anti-RNP antibodies; (c) anti-Sm-D antibodies are specific for SLE, whereas anti-Sm-B/B' are not; (d) within a group of patients with antibodies to RNP, no associations between antibodies to individual sn[U.sub.1]-RNP proteins and symptoms and/or organ involvement were found, except for a possible association between decreased lung diffusion and the presence of antibodies to proteins A and C.
ANA positivity rates were found to be signifi- cantly higher in patients with RA (p Less than 0.001), with SLE (p Less than 0.001), and with Raynaud phenomenon (p=0.001) in comparison to the controls.
RV: Rheumatoidvasculitis; RP: Raynaud phenomenon; MS: Multiple sclerosis.
Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of the Raynaud phenomenon. UpToDate.