rave

(redirected from Rave culture)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
A party designed to enhance a hallucinogenic experience through music and behavior, which consists of an all-night dance session at a club or party, accompanied by the ingestion of recreational—i.e., not overdose—levels of a designer drug of abuse, ecstasy—MDMA

rave

Rave party Substance abuse A social activity of recent vintage consisting of an all-night dance session at a club or party, often accompanied by the ingestion of recreational doses–ie, not overdose levels–of the 'designer' drug of abuse, ecstasy–MDMA. See Ecstasy.

rave

(rāv) [ME. raven, to be delirious]
1. To talk irrationally, as in delirium.
2. An all-night dance party at which mind-altering drugs, e.g., ecstasy or other amphetamines, are often used.
References in periodicals archive ?
This utopianism also encouraged a kind of New Age wishful thinking, that openness to non-Western religions and philosophies and herbal 'smart drinks' would lead the way to a technological communion with nature, thus earning the 1988-9 rise of rave culture in the UK the nickname of 'the second summer of love'.
For Svich, the staging for this modern incarnation of the ancient Greek myth emerges directly from a fusion of various elements from youth and rave cultures and allows a critique that blends its timelessness (the Greek narrative) with its contemporaneity (Latin America, a rave).
Rave culture, as it existed in Southern Ontario in the mid to late 1990s, was a largely middle class culture of youth whose members were renowned for their interest in computer-generated dance music, attendance at all-night dance parties and, in many cases, amphetamine drugs.
His work is influenced by anthropology as well as rave culture.
This dismissal, as well as their evident distaste for electronic music, prevents the two from considering techno music and rave culture in any sort of musical or historical context, which, along with other more theoretical issues to be discussed below, makes a balanced conclusion about the nature of the event virtually impossible for the two authors to achieve.
Eventually, Wilson loses his record label and club, which drew huge crowds - the beginning of the rave culture.
Similarly dynamic is the art of Australian contemporary artist Mathieu Gallois, which Anthony Gardner (Fine Arts) reads parallel to rave culture through the lens of 'virtuality'.
Previous work on rave culture is discussed in this context.
Members of the '6os counterculture are all grown up, and now youth rave culture is the latest target.
Perils of abortion, homosexuality, rave culture and more are among the "horrors" illustrated in this annual live Texas spook-show.
The rave culture is one in which drug use not only exists, but is encouraged.