mutation rate

(redirected from Rate of mutation)

mu·ta·tion rate

the probability (or proportion) of progeny genes with a particular component of the genome not present in either biologic parent; usually expressed as the number of mutants per generation occurring at one gene or locus.

mutation rate

(1) The rate of a new mutation in a particular gene, either per gamete or per generation.
(2) The number of mutations per cell division, determined by Luria-Dulbruck fluctuation analysis.

mu·ta·tion rate

(myū-tā'shŭn rāt)
The probability (or proportion) of progeny genes with a particular component of the genome not present in either biologic parent; usually expressed as the number of mutants per generation occurring at one gene or locus.

mutation rate

The number of instances of a particular gene mutation occurring in a population in one generation.

mutation rate

the number of mutations per gene in a fixed time. In sexual organisms this is often measured as the number of mutations per gamete. Rates vary considerably between genes and between organisms, but a typical rate is 1 mutation per locus per 100 000 gametes. In bacteria it can be measured as the average number of mutations per cell per division.
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus sparks an emergency 'SOS' response, which increases the rate of mutation in microbial DNA, resulting in hardy and persistent variants better able to resist antibiotics.
Prior studies have identified interspecific differences in the frequency of observed somatic mutations (Schweinsberg et al., 2015), but it is not clear whether this is driven by disparities in the mutational properties of separate markers, environmental effects, or true species variation in the rate of mutation accumulation.
BRAF mutant/MSS cancers of the serrated pathway have been found to have a comparably high rate of p53 mutation as the BRAF wild-type cancers, whereas BRAF mutant/MSI cancers were confirmed to have a low rate of mutation [9].
The similarity in successful mutation analysis between the two groups effectively disproved the hypothesis that the dominant reason for the lower than expected rate of mutation analysis was a result of insufficient sample from a cytological diagnostic techniques.
However, the rate of mutation of the NPHS1 gene varies amongst different ethnic groups outside of Finland ranging from 39 to 80% in CNS cases [15-19].
However, the optimum setting for the rate of mutation cannot be identified without a scientific approach.
The rate of mutation in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer is 60-70% [23-25].
Mycobacteria develop natural resistance to drugs by spontaneous mutations and the rate of mutation for each drug is different (Riley 1993).
It was concluded that the increased rate of mutation resulted from ingesting contaminated food coupled with mutations of the genetic material passed from the parent to the next generation.
What was the rate of mutation development among all infected patients in the current study?