Rastafarian

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Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
He "positively identified with Rastafarianism in the Caribbean and sought to bring a materialist understanding to their interpretation of African History." (43) Rodney's activism embraced the African heritage of Caribbean culture and fused it with a Black Caribbean socialist framework.
To me, you cannot talk about modern Caribbean society without talking about Rastafarianism and the influence they have had on cultural and historical life.
So too the teachings of Marcus Garvey haunt the Rastafari movement: his Afrocentric beliefs and his 'back to Africa' campaigns caused him to be adopted as a prophet of Rastafarianism, for back in the 1920s Garvey espoused the notion that all African Americans should board ships back 'home' to Africa (which is what Patterson alluded to in his 1964 novel--see note vi).
I think everything about Rastafarianism is super sick, like the natural lifestyle, but I don't read The Bible and pray to Jah every day.
Drugs are consumed by young people because they are young, by clubbers because they are clubbers, and by Rastafarians because they are Rastafarians; drugs therefore become freighted with cultural meanings around youth, clubbing, and Rastafarianism.
Although it is not stated explicitly, there is a criticism of Rastafarianism in this poem.
In which country did the religion of Rastafarianism originate?
Partridge (religious studies, Lancaster University) follows the development of this style from its origins in the late 1960s and the 1970s to its current influence on styles including hip hop, trance, and electronic, paying particular attention to the Jamaican background of dub (especially its relationship to Rastafarianism) and to dub reggae's aesthetic and spiritual significance.
Religions: Roman Catholic, Protestant (Methodist, Pentecostal, Seventh-Day Adventist, and Baptist), Islam, Baha'i, Rastafarianism, Anglican, Jehovah's Witnesses, Nazarene, Church of Christ, and Brethren Christian Churches.
Olive Lewin follows with two chapters on the rich African heritage in Jamaican musical traditions, including practices associated with Jamaica's four major "cult" groups (Maroon, Kumina, Revival, and Rastafarianism), mento, Jonkunnu, ska, and reggae.
I thought long and hard about including some reggae and skasongs with biblical themes like Bob Marley's "Exodus" or the Melodians' "Rivers of Babylon" or Desmond Dekker's "Israelites." But I was concerned about construing Rastafarianism as some kind of bastardized crypto-Jewish tradition: those songs are Christian songs, Rasta songs, not Jewish songs.
Apart from music one of the major contributions, if one may say so, Marley had made was to unite the Jamaicans in particular and blacks in general through the way of life called Rastafarianism. The man, Bob Marley, personified the idea of Rastafari.