Rastafarian

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Related to Rastafari movement: Bob Marley, Rastafarianism, Rastafarian JAH

Rastafarian

(răs-tă-fă′rē-ăn)
A religious cult that originated in Jamaica in the 1930s and has members in the Caribbean, Europe, Canada, and the U.S. It is of medical importance because cult members' dietary practices may lead to vitamin B12 deficiency with subsequent neurological disease, megaloblastic anemia, or both.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
The impossibility of cooperation between these two locals of the EWF was to have a great impact on the Rastafari movement in its push towards the foundation of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.
In the specific case of the Rastafari movement in Jamaica and the confrontations that exploded in Coral Gardens, the Rastafari claimed freedom of movement for themselves and for other oppressed Jamaicans.
Just last month, CARICOM (Caribbean Community) finally heeded the regional Rastafari movement's longstanding call for reparation for slavery.
A new twist to the African Diasporamodernist agenda came with the introduction of the Rastafari movement in Jamaica among the working class and peasantry in the the 1930s.
A review and critique of previous interpretations of the Rastafari movement in the 1970s and 1980s in Jamaica that explores: the I-n-I process that link the person with symbols of divinity, the ideal of independent and integrated ethos or lifestyle consistent with one's social and cultural origins, the social and ethical implications of the Rastafari movement as a catalyst for radical social change and the sociological meaning of Rasta poetic expressions.
In this article, I examine Leonard Percival Howell's foundational leadership of the Rastafari movement to show his contribution to black nationalism and by extension, his role in Jamaica's fight against colonialism.
(3) Michael Barnett "Differences and Similarities Between the Rastafari Movement and the nation of Islam in Journal of Black Studies Vol.
Moreover, it examines the reception of the Rastafari movement and its culture in postwar Britain as well as the emergence of both musical genres in Jamaica.
Set to explore themes of Caribbean identity in a postcolonial framework, the work speaks of modern-day environmental, spiritual, and political concerns to incorporate dimensions of reggae and the Rastafari movement to express stories of history, place, and the human condition.
With a sociological approach enriched by the concepts of "glocal cultures" and "creolization," Steve Gadet's book is an important contribution to the understanding and analysis of the entanglement of two cultural practices: the Rastafari movement from Jamaica and the hip-hop movement from the United States.
With the Rastafari movement having its roots in AIRs, it would be interesting to see the various strategies that they employ for enforcing a sustainable use of natural resources.