rare earth element

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rare earth element

One of a series of metallic elements that follow lanthanum (at. no. 57) in the periodic table of elements and that have oxides with similar properties. The series comprises the 14-element lanthanide series (at. nos. 58-71 and includes praseodymium, promethium, and ytterbium.
See also: element
References in periodicals archive ?
Development and extraction of rare-earth metals is one of the most promising and profitable industries.
The lopsided analysis of Japan over China leaves an incomplete theoretical background that is then used as a lens to analyze the redress movement, Taiwan, rare-earth metals, ODA programs, and the Trans-Pacific Partnership.
Heavy rare-earth metals are typically needed in such magnets to deliver heat resistance properties.
China, which accounts for over 80 percent of global production of rare-earth metals, is boosting domestic reserves.
This finding is based on imports in India of Inorganic Chemicals, Organic or Inorganic Compounds of Precious Metals of Rare-Earth Metals and Radioactive Elements of Isotopes of InfodriveIndia.com and is compiled from bills of entry filed by Indian Importers at Indian customs through March- 2014 at more than 170+ ports in India like JNPT, Bombay Air and Sea , Chennai Air & Sea , Delhi IGI Air, Delhi Tughlakhabad ICD, Delhi Patparganj, Kolkata Air and Sea, Bangalore Air and many more.
The technology for extraction of such rare-earth metals as cobalt and nickel was developed in conjunction with Japan Metals & Chemicals Co., a Tokyo-based metal maker, the automaker said.
China is compiling strategic reserves in rare-earth metals in moves likely to affect the world market prices, the Wall Street Journal has reported.
stocks of rare-earth metals and find new ways to collect, use, reduce, reuse, and recycle these metals.
That may change, however, as demand for rare-earth metals rises for use in products such as smartphones, electric and hybrid cars, common computer monitors and televisions.
jointly develop rare-earth metals, with Japan providing exploration and
But titanium dioxide on its own doesn't perform well enough to replace the expensive, rare-earth metals or fire-prone carbon-based materials used in today's lithium-ion batteries.
Based on its composition, the LBL team's TMSM boasts a 22-42% gain in energy savings performance over other low emissivity glazings and a significant decrease in cost compared to similar mirrors constructed with rare-earth metals. The key to the TMSM's usefulness is its reflective electrochromic property which enables it to switch from a transparent, to a mirrored, or partially mirrored state to accommodate the needs of the user.