rare earth element

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rare earth element

One of a series of metallic elements that follow lanthanum (at. no. 57) in the periodic table of elements and that have oxides with similar properties. The series comprises the 14-element lanthanide series (at. nos. 58-71 and includes praseodymium, promethium, and ytterbium.
See also: element
References in periodicals archive ?
That's vastly more than the United States, which relies on China for about 80 percent of its rare-earth imports.
Rare-earth magnets are strong permanent magnets made from alloys of rare-earth elements.
Taiwan's rare earth mineral, called 'monazite,' contains more than 50 percent of rare-earth elements, according to Business Weekly.
But for 15 years, China imposed limits on rare-earth exports, citing a need to cut pollution and conserve supplies.
The study finds that demand for amorphous iron has increased significantly over the past few years as end-users are aiming to reduce their dependency on rare-earth magnets, due to their fluctuating supply and soaring prices.
Molycorp, Chinalco Yunnan Copper Resources Ltd., Great Western Minerals Group, Inner Mongolia Baotou Steel Rare-Earth Hi-Tech Co., Alkane Resources, Rare Elements Resources Ltd., Greenland Rare Earth and Energy Ltd., Arafura Resources, China Rare Earth Holdings, Lynas Corp.
In particular, biological effects of rare-earth nanoparticles on human's central nervous system are still unclear.
According to the Wall Street Journal, "in the first 11 months of last year, the value of China's rare-earth exports fell 33% from a year earlier, according to customs data" after China dropped the decade-old quota.
has developed a new electric motor for hybrid vehicles that tackles two top challenges in manufacturing the crucial drivetrain component: The high cost and uncertain supply of the rare-earth metals used in their powerful magnets.
China's top producer of rare earths, the Inner Mongolia Baotou Steel Rare-Earth (Group) Hi-Tech Co., was joined last year by several other organizations to form the trade exchange for rare earth metals.
The US Department of Energy is investing $120 million in a research center, based in Iowa, to develop new methods for environmentally sound rare-earth production, reports Katia Moskvitch, BBC News technology reporter.
said Tuesday it has developed what it describes as the world's first process to extract and recycle rare-earth metals from the nickel hydride batteries of its used hybrid cars on a mass-production basis.