random effects model

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random effects model

A statistical model that may be used in meta-analysis, in which both within-study sampling error (variance) and between-studies variation are included in assessing the uncertainty or confidence interval of the results of the meta-analysis.
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of random-effect model (pD=20.9 and DIC=23.3) were similar to the fixed-effect model (pD=15.9 and DIC=67.7).
Next, Columns (7) through (9) report results from the application of fixed-effect model, Columns (10) through (12) provides a similar report from the estimation of a random-effect model, and, finally, the last three columns do the same job for a random-coefficient model, where coefficient randomness is assumed to apply only to the coefficient of our concern, the level of corruption (cp i).
A random-effect model was used to summarise the results when the heterogeneity was high or medial, otherwise a fixed-effect model was used.
Heterogeneity was measured using [I.sup.2].18 When [I.sup.2] is less than 50% and p>0.10, the results were considered homogeneous and the fixed-effect model was used; when [I.sup.2] is greater than 50% but less than 75%, results were considered heterogeneous and the random-effect model was used.
A fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenszel) was applied in case of absence of heterogeneity between studies and otherwise a random-effect model was performed.
Homogenous data was calculated using the fixed-effect model, and random-effect model was employed when there was statistically significant heterogeneity.
Two approaches are developed to capture the unobserved heterogeneity: fixed-effect model and random-effect model. The fixed-effect model examines cross-sectional and/or time-serial difference in the intercept term.
Lagrangian multiplier test statistic of 21.78 and p-value = 0 supports the preference for the random-effect model rather than for the pooled model.
The results show lagged health expenditure HEVt--1 is positive and statistically significant at the 0.01 level in the random-effect model and at the 0.05 level in the pooled and the fixed- effect models.
In a random-effect model, there is an extra factor added in the equation to control the country-specific random element.
According to the random-effect model, each respondent bases both the initial and the follow-up questions on a WTP amount that has mean value equal to the respondent's true WTP; but the actual WTP amount used when responding to a particular payment question is subject to random error.