Ramsay Hunt syndrome


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Ramsay Hunt syndrome

 [ram´ze-hunt]
herpes zoster involving the facial and auditory nerves associated with ipsilateral facial paralysis, usually transitory, and herpetic vesicles of the external ear or tympanic membrane, which also may or may not be associated with tinnitus, vertigo, and hearing disorders. Called also herpes zoster auricularis or oticus, geniculate neuralgia, and Hunt's neuralgia.

Hunt syn·drome

(hŭnt),
1. an intention tremor beginning in one extremity, gradually increasing in intensity, and subsequently involving other parts of the body; Synonym(s): ataxia with myoclonus, progressive cerebellar tremor
2. facial paralysis, otalgia, and herpes zoster resulting from viral infection of the seventh cranial nerve and geniculate ganglion;
3. a form of juvenile paralysis agitans associated with primary atrophy of the pallidal system. Synonym(s): paleostriatal syndrome, pallidal syndrome
Synonym(s): Ramsay Hunt syndrome (1)

Ramsay Hunt Syndrome

(răm′zē hŭnt′)
n.
1. A condition characterized by facial paralysis, ear pain, and often rash, tinnitus, or vertigo, caused by reactivation of the varicella-zoster virus usually in the geniculate ganglion.
2. Any of several neurological disorders characterized by progressive ataxia with myoclonus.

Ramsay Hunt syndrome

Hunt syndrome ENT A condition that occurs when herpes zoster affects the auditory nerves Clinical Intense ear and mastoid pain, facial nerve paralysis, hearing loss, vertigo, tinnitus, aguesia–loss of taste, dry mouth, dry eyes, herpetic lesions in the auditory canal, mouth, face, neck, and scalp Management Analgesics; pain may be refractory Prognosis Residual loss of function is the norm. See Herpes zoster.

her·pes zos·ter oti·cus

(hĕr'pēz zos'tĕr ō'ti-kŭs)
A painful varicella virus infection presenting with a vesicular eruption on the pinna, with or without facial nerve paralysis.
Synonym(s): Ramsay Hunt syndrome (2) .

Hunt syn·drome

(hŭnt sin'drōm)
1. An intention tremor beginning in one limb, gradually increasing in intensity, and subsequently involving other parts of the body.
2. Facial paralysis, otalgia, and herpes zoster resulting from viral infection of the seventh cranial nerve and geniculate ganglion.
3. A form of juvenile paralysis agitans associated with primary atrophy of the pallidal system.
Synonym(s): Ramsay Hunt syndrome (1) .

Hunt,

James Ramsay, U.S. neurologist, 1872-1937.
Hunt atrophy - obsolete term for atrophy of the small muscles of the hand, without sensory disturbances.
Hunt neuralgia - a severe paroxysmal lancinating pain deep in the ear. Synonym(s): geniculate neuralgia
Hunt paradoxical phenomenon - in torsion dystonia, extension of the foot in response to passive flexion and flexion in response to attempted passive extension.
Hunt syndrome - (1) an intention tremor beginning in one extremity and subsequently involving other parts of the body. Synonym(s): progressive cerebellar tremor; - (2) facial paralysis, otalgia, and herpes zoster resulting from viral infection of the seventh cranial nerve and geniculate ganglion. Synonym(s): herpes zoster oticus; - (3) a form of juvenile paralysis agitans associated with primary atrophy of the pallidal system. Synonym(s): paleostriatal syndrome; pallidal syndrome; Ramsay Hunt syndrome
Ramsay Hunt syndrome - Synonym(s): Hunt syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Diagnosis of Ramsay Hunt syndrome is typically made clinically, but can be confirmed with direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) analysis, (10) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing, (11) or viral culture of vesicular exudates.
Anton for his interest in our article, "Ramsay Hunt syndrome, type 1." Dr.
We diagnosed Ramsay Hunt syndrome in patients with peripheral facial palsy accompanied by eruption of the ear and/or sensory hearing loss.
The 47 patients followed up for more than 6 months after the onset of palsy comprised 28 patients with Bell's palsy and 19 patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome. Figure 1 shows the clinical efficacy in all patients, as evaluated by the Yanagihara score.
Patients with Bell's palsy showed a significantly higher recovery rate than patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome (Bell's palsy: 65.2% and Ramsay Hunt syndrome: 27.8%; p=0.017).
DISCUSSION: Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the second most common cause of atraumatic peripheral facial paralysis.
CONCLUSION: The case has been reported due to its rarity and to demonstrate the usefulness of a combination of steroid and acyclovir therapy in the management of Ramsay Hunt syndrome.
(1.) Goldani LZ, da Silva LF, Dora JM; Ramsay Hunt syndrome in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.
Favorable outcome of Ramsay Hunt syndrome under dexamethasone.
Classical Ramsay Hunt Syndrome can be associated with vesicular rash of the ear or mouth (as many as 80% of cases), the rash might precede the onset of facial paresis/ palsy (involvement of the seventh cranial nerve, ipsilateral lower motor neuron facial paresis/palsy, vertigo and ipsilateral hearing loss, tinnitus, otalgia, headaches, dysarthria, gait ataxia, fever, cervical adenopathy, facial weakness usually reaches maximum severity by 1 week after the onset of symptoms.
PHYSICAL FINDINGS: The primary physical findings in classical Ramsay Hunt Syndrome include peripheral facial nerve paresis with associated rash or herpetic blisters in the distribution of the nervus intermedius(4).
TREATMENT: Corticosteroids and oral Acyclovir are commonly used in the treatment of Ramsay Hunt Syndrome. A recent study concluded that controlled release oxycodone was safe and well tolerated in patients experiencing acute pain due to herpes zoster (6).