radon

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radon

 [ra´don]
a chemical element, atomic number 86, atomic weight 222, symbol Rn. (See Appendix 6.) Radon is a colorless, gaseous, radioactive element produced by the disintegration of radium.

ra·don (Rn),

(rā'don),
A gaseous radioactive element, atomic no. 86, resulting from the breakdown of radium; of the isotopes with mass numbers between 198 and 228, only 222Rn is medically significant as an α-emitter, with a half-life of 3.8235 days; it is used in the treatment of certain malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the country have accumulated a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.
[from radium]

radon

/ra·don/ (ra´don) a gaseous radioactive element, at. no. 86, symbol Rn, resulting from decay of radium.

radon

(rā′dŏn)
n. Symbol Rn
A colorless, radioactive, inert gaseous element that is formed by the radioactive decay of radium and is used to produce neutrons for research. Its most stable isotope is Rn-222 with a half-life of 3.82 days. A natural source of radiation found in most soils and groundwater, radon poses a serious health threat if inhaled. Atomic number 86; melting point -71°C; boiling point -61.7°C; density of gas 9.73 grams per liter; specific gravity (solid) 4. See Periodic Table.

radon (Rn)

[rā′don]
Etymology: L, radiare, to emit rays
a radioactive, chemically inert, gaseous element. Its atomic number is 86, and its atomic mass is 222. A decay product of radium, radon is used in radiation cancer therapy. Radon is also released by rocks, soil, and groundwater and is a common source of background radiation, with an intensity that varies in different geographic areas.

radon

A naturally occurring radioactive gas in the decay chain of uranium-238 to lead-206, which has a half-life of 3.8 days; it decays into two solid, alpha-particle-emitting daughters. Radon exposure is associated with 13-fold increased risk of lung cancer in non-smoking uranium miners; it also increases the risk of childhood cancer, myeloid leukaemia, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma and prostate cancer.

13,000 annual excess cases of lung cancer in the US are attributed to radon gas. Long-term exposure to 150 Bq/m3 is equivalent to smoking half a pack of cigarettes a day; at ≥ 10.8 pCi/L (400 Bq/m3), the relative risk is 1.8; combined radon exposure and smoking exceed an additive and approach a multiplicative effect.

radon

222Ra Public health A natural radioactive gaseous element, atomic number 86; atomic weight, 211.4 in the 238U → 206Pb decay chain; radon has a T1⁄2 of 3.8 days, decays into 2 solid α particle-emitting daughters; radon exposure carries a relative risk of 12.7 for lung CA in non-smoking uranium miners and an ↑ risk of childhood CA, myelogenous leukemia, renal cell carcinoma, melanoma, prostate CA. See Radionics, Radium Dial Company.

ra·don

(rā'don)
A gaseous radioactive element, atomic no. 86, resulting from the breakdown of radium; 222Rn is medically significant as an alpha-emitter with a half-life of 3.8235 days; it is used in the treatment of some malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the United States accumulate a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.

ra·don

(rā'don)
A gaseous radioactive element, resulting from breakdown of radium; some isotopes used to treat malignancies. Poorly ventilated homes in some parts of the U.S. have accumulated a dangerous amount of naturally occurring radon gas.

radon

a chemical element, atomic number 86, atomic weight 222, symbol Rn. See Table 6. Radon is a colorless, gaseous, radioactive element produced by the disintegration of radium.
References in periodicals archive ?
The distribution of indoor radon gas in both Ottawa and Kent counties had similar frequency distributions (Figure 1).
This study is the first of its kind to employ radon gas monitoring as a tool in properly exploring and delineating the hitherto poorly explored Karak Thrust in District Karak.
Samples #1~#4 were placed in the container, and concentrations of radon gas emanating at different points before compression, during compression, and after compression were measured every 5 min.
The third section explored the degree of threat for each of a set of pre-selected environmental 11 risk items: water pollution, environmental tobacco smoke, air pollution, ozone depletion, exposure to radon gas, soil pollution, and exposure to ELF-EMF, noise pollution, formaldehyde related with furniture, ground ozone and pesticides.
2) Occupational and residential exposure to radon gas has been associated with lung cancer, (3,4) and estimates suggest that radon is a factor in 10-15% of all lung cancer cases in North America.
The authority is already taking proactive steps to help tenants living in parts of the island with elevated radon gas levels to measure the level of radon in their homes.
The World Health Organization and EPA have identified Radon Gas as the leading cause of lung cancer for non-smokers.
As a result, some houses contain levels of radon gas and radon daughters even higher than those in mines.
The Saudi Geological Survey (SGS) confirmed that all the variables in terms of thermal measurements and concentrations of radon gas, carbon dioxide, and the widening cracks in the ground are at safe rates.
However, variables such as temperature upheavals, radon gas and carbon dioxide concentration remained unchanged.
Q: I recently read in a magazine article that granite countertops emit radon gas.
To imply that I did not know the difference between different types of radioactivity was his silly attempt to distract from the fact that the radiation from the sun kills up to 1,000 people and radon gas from natural granite outcrops kills up to 3,000 people every year in the UK.