radiophobia


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ra·di·o·pho·bi·a

(rā'dē-ō-fō'bē-ă),
Morbid fear of radiation, as from x-rays or nuclear energy.
[radio- + G. phobos, fear]

radiophobia

(rā″dē-ō-fō′bē-ă) [″ + Gr. phobos, fear]
An abnormal fear of x-rays and radiation.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A nuclear power station is able to produce energy for around 30 or 40 years, then it has to be mothballed, forever Cbnet Radiophobia - a morbid fear of ionising radiation.
Emerging the topic of radiophobia is important, as it can lead to misdiagnosis.
Chernobyl's evacuation produced epidemics of physical and psychological disturbances, alcohol and drug abuse, and suicides, caused not by radiation but by radiophobia. Radiation claimed no lives yet is condemned in the mere mention of the names Chernobyl and Fukushima.
"Heroes with a Half Life: Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and American Repression of Radiophobia after Chernobyl." JPC 46.5 (2013): 931-49.
The acute and painful perception of the radiation effects and the pronounced "radiophobia" among the population potentiate the effects of terrorism (Dodgen, Norwood, Becker, Perez, and Hansen, 2011; ICRP, 2006; NCRP, 2010).
Keeping in mind the pronounced "radiophobia" among the population, family physicians should be able to answer their patients whether a certain condition is due to radiation exposure.
In view of the facts described below in the section on nuclear radiation, it seems likely that at least the current overestimation of radiation hazards ("radiophobia") will dissipate in the wake of the first "live" nuclear attack.
Therefore, as already mentioned above, it seems logical that the current overestimation of radiation hazards--"radiophobia"--will dissipate in the wake of the first large-scale radiological or nuclear attack.
In 1992 the nuclear industry celebrated its 50th anniversary with a report saying that six years after the Chernobyl nuclear disaster there was no evidence of long term effects apart from radiophobia, a psychological fear of radiation.
We should revise our radiophobia and again enjoy radioactive spas and sunshine.
For the hundreds of patients with thyroid cancer, the combination of world-class health care and a refuge from the psychic weight of radiophobia has led to dramatic recovery rates.
They believe that |many people are exploiting the biggest consequences of the Chernobyl accident -- the radiophobia -- to further their own aims'.