radionuclide

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radionuclide

 [ra″de-o-noo´klīd]
a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd),
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity.

radionuclide

/ra·dio·nu·clide/ (-noo´klīd) a nuclide that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

radionuclide

[-no̅o̅′klīd]
Etymology: L, radiare + nucleus, nut kernel
an isotope that undergoes radioactive decay. Any element with an excess of either neutrons or protons in the nucleus is unstable and tends toward radioactive decay, with the emission of energy that may be measurable with a detector. The processes of radioactive decay include beta particle emission, electron capture, isomeric transition, and positron emission. Positron-emitting radionuclides are important in positron emission tomography and in medical research. Radionuclides used in scintigraphy include 123I, 131I, 111In, 75Se, 99mTc, and 201Tl. Radionuclides of cobalt, iodine, phosphorus, strontium, and other elements are used for treatment of tumors and cancers and for nuclear imaging of internal parts of the body. See also nuclear scanning.

radionuclide

Radioactive isotope, radioisotope Radiation physics A nuclide with an unstable neutron to proton ratio, which undergoes radioactive decay; an artificial or natural nuclide with an unstable nucleus, that decays spontaneously, emitting electrons–β-particles or protons–α-particles and γ-radiation, ultimately achieving nuclear stability; RNs are used as in vivo or in vitro labels, for RT, or as sources of energy

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

Radionuclide

A chemical substance, called an isotope, that exhibits radioactivity. A gamma camera, used in nuclear medicine procedures, will pick up the radioactive signals as the substance gathers in an organ or tissue. They are sometimes referred to as tracers.

ra·di·o·nu·clide

(rā'dē-ō-nū'klīd)
An isotope of artificial or natural origin that exhibits radioactivity. Radionuclides are used in diagnostic imaging and cancer therapy.

radionuclide (rā´dēōnoo´klīd),

n an unstable or radioactive type of atom characterized by the constitution of its nucleus and capable of existing for a measurable time. The nuclear constitution is specified by the number of protons
(A), number of neutrons
(N), and energy content, or alternatively by the atomic number
(Z), mass number
(A − N + Z), and atomic mass.

radionuclide

a radioactive nuclide; one that disintegrates with the emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations. Used in diagnosis for whole body or individual organ scanning. See also radioactive isotope, nuclide.
References in periodicals archive ?
Steve Brodie, CEO and president of Purolite, said, 'In conjunction with our Japanese partner, we have been able to demonstrate the successful reduction of all 62 radionuclides in the contaminated water to non-detect levels set by TEPCO.
Hence various approaches have been put forth for the modification of the nanoparticles to include various radionuclides rendering them available for nuclear imaging.
PPE can, however, protect the responder from internal or external radionuclide contamination.
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The production problem gets further complicated by issues such as laws regarding DOEfunded facilities competing with commercial companies for production of radionuclides and requirements concerning cost recovery.
But recovering radionuclides requires a lot more than just soaking up water.
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Key words: Arctic, concentration factors, biota, dynamic models, radionuclides, uptake, allometric
Characterization of commercially available instruments for measurement and identification of unknown radionuclides was carried out in support of the development and testing of the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard, N42.