Radiolaria


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Related to Radiolaria: Diatoms

Radiolaria

a group of marine, planktonic protozoans, possessing siliceous skeletons and forming benthic oozes (see BENTHOS).
References in periodicals archive ?
Microfacies: Varying from well-orientated carbonate mud-wackestone that consists mainly of well-rounded poorly-preserved silt-sized calcite grains (probably disarticulated and eroded bivalve fragments) and radiolaria to complete micrite-dominated accumulations.
- Thick-bedded Limestone with yellow weathered to buff color and in some cases pink to red having radiolaria, saccocoma, tintinid and sponge spicule
Today, we revere him for discovering, describing, and drawing 4000 species of Radiolaria: tiny, single-celled sea organisms that absorb silica and extrude glass-like skeletons, "amoeba-like drops of protoplasm, each species a translucent cage."
Millenial scale climate variability of the northeast Pacific Ocean and northwest North America based on radiolaria and pollen.
From Charles Darwin's study of barnacles to Ernst Haeckel's monumental works on radiolaria, sponges, and corals, a grand nineteenth-century tradition, sustained by both amateur and professional naturalists, encouraged an absorbed, meditative engagement with extremely basic organisms.
As for that name radiolarian, which has a vaguely musical ring to it, Martin discovered a science book containing illustrations of creatures called radiolarians or radiolaria.
Papers by Paul Smith on Early Jurassic molluscs, Claudia Schroder-Adams and Jim Haggart on Jurassic foraminifera, Elizabeth Carter and Jira Haggart on Jurassic and Cretaceous radiolaria, and Justine Pearson and Richard Hebda on leaf morphotypes are all consistent with northerly late Mesozoic paleolatitudes for the outboard insular terrane, in opposition to the paleomagnetically-indicated more southerly option.
The flora and fauna of this shale is dominated by the microfossil groups foraminifera, radiolaria, diatoms, and macrofossil groups like filamentous algae, cetaceans, sirenians, pinnipeds, fish, birds, ostracod crustaceans, bivalves, gastropods, bryozoans, polychaetes, leaves, and woody plant debris (Buckeridge & Finger 2001).
Primary productivity by symbiont-bearing planktonic sarcodines (Acantharia, Radiolaria and Foraminifera) in surface waters near Bermuda.