radicular pain


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Related to radicular pain: somatic pain

ra·dic·u·lar pain

(ră-dik'yū-lăr pān)
Pain along the pathway of a spinal nerve.

radicular pain

Pain that radiates away from the spinal column through an extremity or the torso resulting from the compression or irritation of a spinal nerve root or large paraspinal nerve. It may be accompanied by numbness or tingling.
See also: pain
References in periodicals archive ?
The efficacy of transforaminal injection of steroids for the treatment of lumbar radicular pain. Pain Medicine 2010;11(8):1149-68.
The majority of the patients (76.7%) had additional radicular pain. A sensory loss in the symptomatic leg was present in 43 patients (58.9%).
TNF-[alpha], IL-1[beta], and IL-6 are potent proinflammatory factors, which play an important role in radicular pain [3-5].
At 5-month follow-up, she had complete resolution of her back pain and was full strength with some intermittent left radicular pain.
They concluded that this treatment was more effective in patients with certain lower extremity radicular pain syndromes.
Radicular pain is a common chronic pain, which is commonly caused by disc herniation, although a space occupying lesion in the lumbosacral spine or spondylolisthesis can also result in such clinical condition.
Continuous burning pain was noted in 10 and intermittent radicular pain in 15 cases.
Patients were excluded if they had radicular pain radiating below the gluteal folds, direct trauma to the back within the previous month, pain duration >2 weeks, or a recent history of >1 LBP episode per month.
Interference in transmission of impulses along those nerve pathways is clearly a cause of significant pathology, such as paralysis, significant radicular pain, and reduced functional capabilities of multiple organ systems.
A total of 269 adults with radicular pain for 3 months or less, an Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) of at least 30, and a herniated disk confirmed on MRI were randomized to prednisone or placebo.
Further, 46(51%) cases and 22(27.5%) controls had a history of chronic back pain for more than three months (p=0.001); 32(35.6%) cases and 17(21.2%) controls had a history of radicular pain (p=0.02); 52(57.7%) cases and 23(28.8%) controls had LBP in the last month (p=0.0001); lumbar trophoedema was present in 85(95%) cases and 58(72%) controls (p=0.0001); and 31(35%) cases and 19(24%) controls had lumbar paraspinal muscle atrophy (p=0.2).
In patients with low back pain without radicular pain the effect of a single dose intramuscular injection in pain relief through a month was the same as placebo (61).