reconstruction

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reconstruction

 [re″kon-struk´shun]
1. the reassembling or re-forming of something from constituent parts.
2. surgical restoration of function of a body part, such as with a bypass or plastic surgery.
aortic reconstruction restoration of function to a damaged aorta, as by bypass or aortoplasty.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn),
The computerized synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in computed tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is two-dimensional Fourier transformation.

reconstruction

An eClinical trial term of art for archival trial records that should support the data as well as the processes used for obtaining and managing the data, such that the trustworthiness of results obtained can be evaluated. Reconstruction from records should confirm the validity of the information system and its conformance to applicable regulations during design and execution of the trial, as well as during the period of record retention.

re·con·struc·tion

(rē'kŏn-strŭk'shŭn)
The computed synthesis of one or more two-dimensional images from a series of x-ray projections in tomography, or from a large number of measurements in magnetic resonance imaging; several methods are used; the earliest was back-projection, and the most common is 2-D Fourier transformation.
References in periodicals archive ?
On 3 November 1887 prominent sugar planters, led by Judge Taylor Beattie, led a campaign of terror and violence that destroyed one of the largest and best organized strikes by Black cane workers, rescued White Louisiana from Radical Reconstruction, and left over 30 Blacks dead and thousands more homeless.
In supporting a generalized interpretation of the War Between the States and Radical Reconstruction Black Charlestonians ignores the Southernness of African Americans who can trace their Charleston roots back to the 1600s.
In its Belmont scenes, in Portia's Venetian journey, and in her control over the riddling accompanying the exchange of rings, the play registers the effects of 'a specific cultural moment when the meaning of marriage is unstable, contested, and open to radical reconstruction'.
We are called, therefore, to a radical reconstruction of our habits.
They suggest a radical reconstruction of social policy.
Mubarak is restrained in his professed ambition to move forward by the potentially disruptive costs of radical reconstruction. He is bound to pay attention to the risks of even higher unemployment as the public sector slims down and higher prices as subsidies are lifted.
Many of the assembly line tasks appear to have been largely the mechanization of earlier manual operations that women performed before 1914, rather than a radical reconstruction of industrial work.
After the 1898 election, the Republican Party, which strongly identified with the Radical Reconstruction and the Civil War, was driven from power.
Despite the rhetoric of Lincoln and the Radical Republicans, Southern notes, "Radical Reconstruction was too radical for the American people and yet not radical enough to ensure the lasting rights and security of African Americans.
Mills Thornton III, "Fiscal Policy and the Failure of Radical Reconstruction in the Lower South," in Region, Race, and Reconstruction: Essays in Honor of C.
While the strength of this book is its attention to maritime work culture, Cecelski leaves this world during the Reconstruction era to tell the story of Abraham Galloway, a former slave who served in the North Carolina senate during Radical Reconstruction. Galloway was certainly an important leader of the black community during this pivotal period, but Cecelski does not concretely connect him to the maritime culture of resistance.
At the moment, the former newspaper office is more like a building site as it undergoes radical reconstruction.