electromagnetic spectrum

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electromagnetic spectrum

the range of frequencies and wavelengths associated with radiant energy.

e·lec·tro·mag·net·ic ra·di·a·tion

, electromagnetic spectrum (ĕ-lek'trō-mag-net'ik rā'dē-ā'shŭn, spek'trŭm)
Wavelike energy propagated through matter or space; varies widely in wavelength, frequency, photon energy, and properties; may be natural or artificial and includes radiowaves, microwaves, heat waves, visible light, ultraviolet light, x-rays, gamma rays, and cosmic radiation.

electromagnetic spectrum

The continuum of radiation, varying in frequency, and, correspondingly, wavelength, that includes, in order of decreasing frequency, cosmic ray photons, gamma rays, X rays, ultraviolet radiation, visible light, infrared radiation, microwaves, radio waves and heat.
Electromagnetic spectrumclick for a larger image
Fig. 142 Electromagnetic spectrum . The wavelength ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum.

electromagnetic spectrum

the entire range of wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, most of which are not detectable by the human eye except in the visible spectrum from about 400–700 nm wavelength. Wavelengths shorter than the visible spectrum contain large quantities of energy which can be harmful to living material. See Fig. 141 . See X-RAY, GAMMA RADIATION, ULTRAVIOLET LIGHT.

electromagnetic spectrum (·lekˈ·trō·mag·neˑ·tik spekˑ·trm),

n the entire range of electromagnetic radiation that extends from the longest (radio waves) to the shortest (gamma radiation) wavelengths.

e·lec·tro·mag·net·ic ra·di·a·tion

, electromagnetic spectrum (ĕ-lek'trō-mag-net'ik rā'dē-ā'shŭn, spek'trŭm)
Wavelike energy propagated through matter or space; varies widely in wavelength, frequency, photon energy, and properties; may be natural or artificial and includes x-rays, gamma rays, and other forms.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, in the late 1960s it was realised that the synchrotron radiation spectrum provided a unique, high-intensity light source which could be very useful.
Data collected during the past year by the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft confirm the uniformity of this cosmic microwave background and the fact that the radiation spectrum resembles that of an ideal heat source, called a blackbody, at a temperature of about 2.
A one-third reduction in beam path length more than doubles the intensity of the primary radiation spectrum on the sample, says Smit, increasing sensitivity by a corresponding factor.
Williams says one of his group's main contributions has been to develop a system that can accurately measure the temperature at high pressures from the radiation spectrum emitted by the iron sample.