radioactive contamination

(redirected from Radiation release)

radioactive contamination

the undesirable addition of radioactive material to the body or part of the environment, such as clothing or equipment. Contamination of the body by beta radiation may occur through the ingestion, inhalation, or absorption of a beta emitter. Instruments, drapes, surgical gloves, and clothing that come in contact with serous fluids, blood, and urine of patients containing beta or gamma radiation emitters may be contaminated. The severity of the contamination is directly related to the elapsed time between the administration of the radioactive isotope and surgery. On completion of the procedure, possibly contaminated material is isolated and checked. If found to be contaminated, it is disposed of according to institutional and federal standards for the disposal of radioactive waste.
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, dental setting emergencies are life-threatening health events, power failure, flooding, violence (active shooter), toxin releases, chemical spills, gas leaks, infectious diseases, chemical or biological attacks, structural collapse, bombings, radiation release, hurricanes, tornados, snowstorms and other events almost impossible to predict.
nuclear waste dump in New Mexico for the first time in three years following a radiation release that contaminated part of the underground repository, the Energy Department said.
Energy Department had the containers sent to Waste Control Specialists in Andrews County, Texas, after a 2014 radiation release forced a nearly three-year closure of the government's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.
The impact of radiation release ("Risk to Environmental Health"), triggered by earthquake and tsunami ("Disaster Trigger Event"), caused the release of the radiation ("Man-Made Hazard"), which was precipitated by site blackout and subsequent loss of cooling system capacity ("Vulnerability Factors").
Although the radiation release didn't result in any direct loss of human life, the accident was sufficient to suspend nuclear programmes in a number of countries, including Germany, which made the decision to shut down its fleet and not build new reactors.
Its radiation release was less significant than that of Chernobyl but the impact is still under study.
An investigation of a radiation release nine days later that contaminated 17 workers is expected in a few weeks.
Radiation Release from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant
Our own plants, we hope, are less immediately vulnerable, but unforeseen combinations of natural disasters, human incompetence, and even terrorist attacks make radiation release all too real a possibility on our own soil.
The severity of the Fukushima accident has been compared to the devastating 1986 Chernoby1 meltedown(the world's worst nuclear accident) in which thousands suffered from the radiation release.
1- 3 units appeared to have melted in the early stages of the accident, after the earthquake and tsunami disrupted the cooling systems, but that the fuel remained almost completely in the reactor vessels, preventing a wide scale radiation release.
The emergency crew is on the job to contain damage round the clock but new reports of radiation release pour in every day.

Full browser ?