Robinson


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Rob·in·son

(rob'in-sŏn),
Brian F., 20th-century British cardiologist. See: Robinson index.
References in classic literature ?
You are not to take it, if you please, as the saying of an ignorant man, when I express my opinion that such a book as ROBINSON CRUSOE never was written, and never will be written again.
The room in which young Robinson lived in New York faced Washington Square and was long and narrow like a hallway.
And so these people gathered and smoked ciga- rettes and talked and Enoch Robinson, the boy from the farm near Winesburg, was there.
That is the kind of thing young Enoch Robinson trembled to say to the guests who came into his room when he was a young fellow in New York City, but he always ended by saying nothing.
"So must I," said the little girl, cheerfully, "for Miss Robinson must be close behind us.
The thought of Miss Robinson close behind us gave wings to my feet, and, casting my dignity, of which, indeed, there was but little left, to the winds, I fairly flew down the path.
"I am afraid poor Miss Robinson must have a wretched life," I said, in tones of deep disgust.
Three of these had already been in this neighborhood, being the veteran Robinson and his companions, Hoback and Rezner, who had accompanied Mr.Henry across the mountains, and who had been picked up by Mr.
Within the year Nellie married Bert Mall, Peter's eldest son, and Martin, at once, bought out her half interest in the farm, stock and implements, giving a first mortgage to Robinson in order to pay cash.
As he sat in the dingy, little backroom of the bank, while Robinson's pen scratched busily drawing up the papers, he was conscious of an odd thrill.
Defoe's energy had not diminished with age and a hard life, and the success of 'Robinson Crusoe' led him to pour out a series of other works of romantic-realistic fiction.
In 1726 (seven years after 'Robinson Crusoe') appeared Swift's masterpiece, the only one of his works still widely known, namely, 'The Travels of Lemuel Gulliver.' The remarkable power of this unique work lies partly in its perfect combination of two apparently inconsistent things, first, a story of marvelous adventure which must always remain (in the first parts) one of the most popular of children's classics; and second, a bitter satire against mankind.