RhIg


Also found in: Acronyms.

RhIg

See Rh immune globulin.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

RhIG

Abbreviation for Rh-immune globulin.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(1) The administration of RhIg is now well established, and physicians may be skeptical about switching to a different protocol.
Currently in the United States, Rh negative mothers receive one antenatal intramuscular dose of 300ug RhIg (1500 UI) at 28 weeks, and one dose up to 72h post-delivery if indicated.
A molecular test in D~ pregnancies may pay for itself by avoiding the costs associated with often unnecessary multiple administrations of RhIG. (4,17,22) Presently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration-approved molecular test kits for determining the Rh type, but several unlicensed products are marketed commercially in the United States.
Guidance for Weak D Typing in the Clinical Laboratory (Standards of Care) Guidance Document Source, y Requirements AABB Standards for Blood Carson, (2) 2012 Banks and Transfusion Services, section 5.28.2 AABB Standards for Blood Carson, (2) 2012 Banks and Transfusion Services, section 5.8.2 Recommendations AABB Technical Manual, Kennedy, (3) 2012 Chapter 22 Guidance Text Requirements Women who are pregnant or who have been pregnant recently shall be considered for RhIG administration when all of the following apply: 1.
To evaluate the effectiveness of the RhIg Dose Calculator, supplemental questions were included in the HBF-B 2009 Survey, asking participants to submit the dose (number of vials) of RhIg that their laboratory would recommend for a postpartum Rh(D)-negative woman whose quantitative assay result for fetal RBCs was "1% = 50 mL whole blood." (4) Of 1681 participants responding, only 1263 (75.1%) submitted the correct answer (3 vials), according to the method of the AABB Technical Manual.
Of 278 proficiency challenges in which the FMH volume would require additional RhIg, 54 laboratories (19.4%) would have recommended inadequate RhIg dosage.
In our view, improving the effectiveness of RhIg dosing would require 2 things: (1) a more accurate calculation of maternal blood volume, such as Dr Ramsey's RhIg Dose Calculator2; and (2) replacement of acid elution FMH quantitation with flow cytometry in all cases in which additional Rh immune globulin doses are indicated by initial Rosette or acid elution test results.
Mothers receiving Rh immune globulin (RhIG) traditionally have remained in the hospital longer.
At the time of the inquiry from the OB department, our procedure for administering RhIG was as follows:
The frequency (20%-30%) with which patients in the 21st century would have received an underdose during rhesus (Rh) immune globulin (RhIG) therapy (1) should be nothing short of shocking to pathologists and clinicians alike.
Since first coming to the US market in 1968, RhIG therapy has become a standard of care for the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) (2) and has been primarily responsible for the dramatic reduction in the mortality from this disease.
Rh immune globulin (RhIG) provides prophylaxis against alloimmunization to the D blood group antigen in Rh(D)-negative patients who are exposed to Rh(D)-positive red blood cells (RBCs) by pregnancy or transfusion.