queuing theory

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queuing theory

A theory by Danish mathematician AK Erlang (1878-1929), which he developed to determine the capacity of telephone networks. Queuing theory (QT) becomes immediately applicable to UK medical practice by substituting hospital beds for Erlang’s telephone lines, call arrival rate for admission rate into beds and average call duration for average length of stay. QT explains why average bed occupancy depends on the size and functional requirements of each specialty bed pool: whereas large hospitals in the USA and Europe have a 77–78% national average bed occupancy rate, the UK average is 87%, a rate which results in larger patient turnaway (e.g., due to queues for a bed, cancelled operations, medical patients in surgical beds), missed waiting time targets and organisational chaos manifested by increased use of antidepressants by overworked staff, increased hospital errors, cross-infection and patient deaths.

R Jones, author of a 2011 paper linking QT to the UK’s chronic bed shortage, argued that the Stafford Hospital scandal and the subsequent 400+ excess deaths were linked to the unrecognised role of excessive whole-hospital occupancy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The author in [16] explored the challenges and benefits of using the queueing theory to model SDN.
As the model's foundation is in queueing theory, it may easily be applied to other health care settings that involve lines to see service providers, particularly in cases where one provider services multiple patients at one time.
(1998) Computation of Availability of a Real-Time System Using Queueing Theory Methodology.
In this paper, we employ queueing theory to model the combined data transmission and data processing systems (links and servers) in sensor Clouds and evaluate the service performance provided by sensor Clouds.
[10] have also used queueing theory to investigate optimal static workload allocations by extending the work in [7] to multi-clusters (where each node in the system is a homogeneous multi-cluster consisting of m processing nodes).
B.: Introduction to Queueing Theory: 2nd Edition, Elsevier, 1980, ISBN 0444010653.
Elements of queueing theory, volume 26 of Applications of Mathematics (New York).
Additional Key Words and Phrases: Adversarial queueing theory, end-to-end delay, network stability, packet scheduling
Part of the expanded science of performance guarantees may include new extensions of queueing theory that emphasize meeting deadlines.
Applicant must document (through transcripts, letters from faculty) successful completion of college courses dealing with use or application of the following: network programming; database management systems (object-oriented and relational database models): current networking and communication standards; data security; UNIX, VAX/VMS, DOS operating systems; queueing theory and network analysis (including open and closed networks, local and global balance in networks of queues); C, C++, and SQL languages; and either Fortran, COBOL, or Pascal language.