queen

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queen

Sociology
A commonly used but derogatory term for a male homosexual, especially one who is flamboyantly effeminate.

Vox populi
A female monarch.
References in periodicals archive ?
[S]everal episodes in The Faerie Queene take place inside discernibly courtly locations.
The Hermit's artful framing of his speech precipitates the formation of his audience, who he hopes to "enforme" and "reduce aright." In the Letter to Ralegh, Spenser similarly describes himself as having "fashioned" The Faerie Queene in order "to fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" (7-8).
This places Duessa in a powerful allegorical role as the only evil figure to have recurring appearances in five of the six books of The Faerie Queene. She does not appear in the sixth book because she is executed in Book V as part of a political allegory.
That Hideous Strength, a space romance laced with strands of a sinister plot to bend all love to an agenda of social engineering, takes much of its inspiration and material from Books III and IV of The Faerie Queene, with occasional allusions to other parts of the poem in both novels.
An academic like Hadfield isn't allowed to believe that Spenser actually meant what he wrote about certain things, and so he continually reads ironically or obliquely, a process that begins with the very first line of The Faerie Queene, "A gentle knight was pricking on the plain." Hitherto, everyone, including the Oxford Dictionary, has thought that this striking line meant that a knight was urging his horse across the plain.
Also the Fairie Queene quote contains the word paine in it.
Cast of Characters: Edmund Spenser and The Faerie Queene
"The epilogue at Court" to Thomas Dekker's Old Fortunatus entreats "O deere Goddesse / Breathe life in our nombd spirits with one smile" (L3v); at the "presentation before Queene E." of Ben Jonson's Every Man Out of his Humor, Macilente recites how "Envie is fled my soule, at sight of her" (175).
The author states the purpose of this revised dissertation early in his introduction: This book will establish a broad historical context for the English Renaissance understanding of the concept of equity, particularly the idea's derivation from the classical Greek concept of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], in order to explain equity's various significations in More's Utopia and Spenser's The Faerie Queene. (1)
Then specific cases come to the forefront: chapter 3 delves into Ariosto's Orlando furioso, chapter 4 Torquato Tasso's Gerusalemme liberata, while chapters 5 and 6 examine Spenser's Fairie Queene.
While this new volume is more evolutionary than revolutionary, it provides a number of fresh views on Spenser, mostly on the middle books of The Faerie Queene.
Alkan, "Britomart's Backward Glance in Spenser's Faerie Queene: Liminal Triumphs/Dark Erotics in Busirane's Mask of Cupid" (79-104); Nora Johnson, "Spectacle and the Fantasy of Immateriality: Authorship and Magic in John a Kent and John a Cumber" (105-20); Sarah Beckwith, "The Play of Voice: Acknowledgment, Knowledge, and Self-Knowledge in Measure for Measure" (121-44); Richard C.