Queen Anne's lace


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Queen Anne's lace,

n Latin name:
Daucus carota; parts used: leaves, seeds, roots; uses: hepatoprotectant, antibacterial, tonsillitis, intestinal parasites, skin conditions; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, cardiac depression, high blood pressure medications, cardiac glycosides, CNS depressants, diuretics. Also called
bee's nest, bird's nest, carrot, devil's plague, mother's die, oil of carrot, philatron, or
wild carrot.

Queen Anne's lace

daucus carota, ammimajus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Queen Anne's Lace (wild carrot) is a naturalized, monocarpic weed (usually biennial) that grows abundantly in open fields and along roadsides in North America.
For instance, cow parsley or Queen Anne's Lace looks wonderful by the roadside, but is a menace in the garden
There are lots of those kinds of plants in her yard: milkweed, verbena, sweet peas, mint, parsley, cornflower, Queen Anne's lace, nasturtium, carrots and dill for caterpillar food, plus so-called nectar plants for the adults to feed on, including wisteria, butterfly bush, forget-me-not, chives, cornflowers, honeysuckle, trumpet vine, lantana, cosmos, iris, salvia, sage, hibiscus and lilies.
The pause gives us time to enjoy our surroundings: a small patch of Queen Anne's lace and, farther away, a luxuriant stand of corn.
Silence nods off in the yards, Queen Anne's lace and chicory louder in silence than nearby traffic, whose silvery whoosh lifts monumentally over the trees but can't quite let go.
The Delicate Touch Collection consists of mixed florals including open roses, hydrangeas, miniature cabbage roses, phlox and queen anne's lace.
THE Dermot Weld, above, trained Queen Anne's Lace might be capable of building on her recent debut success in Gowran Park to land the listed Staffordstown Stud Stakes at the Curragh tomorrow.
Zinnias burst from the center bed, while to their right is lacy corn cockle, a less-weedy Queen Anne's lace substitute, and lime-leafed feverfew.
Tables were each covered in white linens, crisscrossed with burlap runners, and centered with rose-gold painted bottles filled with sprays of Queen Anne's lace surrounded by votives etched in gold-leaf.
Sarais Crawshaw's Queen Anne's Lace creates an almost lace doily effect by cutting paper into flower shapes against a background.
Horticulturist Patrick Hillman selected from the tables some shells, leaves and dried Queen Anne's lace for his decorating challenge - a handbag.
I'm surprised it works so well, especially since the garden is surrounded by fields full of Queen Anne's Lace.