quantum mechanics

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quantum mechanics

quantum mechanics,

n the application of quantum theory to statistical mechanics to explain the properties of matter when examined at the subatomic level. See also quantum.
References in periodicals archive ?
4) This is the point that Schrodinger made with his famous thought-experiment in which, without the collapse, a cat ends up in a state - a superposition of being alive and being dead - which, by the usual quantum-mechanical rules, is a state in which the cat is neither determinately alive nor determinately dead.
Such quantum-mechanical junctions are the foundation of a fledgling memory technology called magnetic random access memory, or MRAM.
Moshammer says the findings decisively rule out both alternatives to rescattering--two or more electrons jumping ship simultaneously by the quantum-mechanical trick called tunneling or an atom spitting out additional electrons as an adjustment to the initial loss of an electron.
Although extremely rudimentary today, such devices may eventually outdo conventional computers by exploiting the quantum-mechanical nature of matter.
Observing interference within each cloud's quantum-mechanical wave behavior yields a precise measurement of gravity at that position.
Atoms of the simplest element, hydrogen, have finally yielded to efforts to supercool them into a single quantum-mechanical state.
Electrons trapped within them exhibit energy levels and quantum-mechanical behavior similar to electrons in atoms.
His algorithm involved the use of quantum-mechanical operations to factor whole numbers (SN: 5/14/94, p.
Now, researchers have introduced the possibility of creating an atomic system in which, for short periods of time, an electron behaves more like a planet orbiting the sun than a quantum-mechanical particle whose behavior is defined strictly in terms of probabilities.
used quantum-mechanical methods and supercomputers to analyze how steel fractures.
But in the quantum-mechanical realm of atoms, electrons, and photons, such "tunneling" behavior has a small but significant probability of occurring.
It's qualitatively consistent with all of the quantum-mechanical predictions in terms of temperature, field, and density--every parameter that we varied," Awschalom says.